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ArvadaPress.com

J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y, C O L O R A D OA publication of

September 4, 2014VOLUME 10 | ISSUE 14

IF YOU GOWHAT: Warbirds over the RockiesWHEN: Sept. 12-14WHERE: Arvada Modelers Airpark, 7608 Highway 93, GoldenCOST: $10 daily admission; Children 15 and under are free

Fact �nding document rejectedWitt pitches pay modelBy Crystal [emailprotected]

Performance means everything.At least, in terms of teacher compensa-

tion for the Jefferson County Board of Edu-cation.

During the Aug. 28 board of education meeting, the board voted (3-2) to reject the fact-finding recommendations regarding negotiations with the district’s teachers as-sociation, the Jefferson County Educators

Association (JCEA), proposing new com-pensation scale.

“Focus on the goal,” said Board Presi-dent Ken Witt during the meeting. “The goal is to have an effective teacher in every classroom, to align the evaluation system and align compensation. Teachers should be rewarded for being effective and not in-effective.”

Following a month of hearings with both sides, the fact finder found the dis-trict’s evaluation system was flawed, and recommended (www.jeffcopublicschools.org/human_resources/negotiations/Jeff-co_fact_finding_report.pdf) teachers rated as “partially effective” should receive an

increase in the 2014-2015 school year, but not receive the increases available to effec-tive or highly effective teachers in the fol-lowing school year, as long as an improve-ments are made to the current evaluation in place.

“Given the lack of reliability of the cur-rent evaluation system, however, it cannot be said that teachers who are rated as ‘par-tially effective’ are, in fact, not effective,” the report read. “A more rigorous and valid evaluation process is required before it can be concluded that granting a step in-crease to teachers rated as partially effec-tive equates with placing ineffective teach-ers in classrooms or rewarding ineffective

teachers.”This was not accepted by the board

majority, who remained firm on having compensation for only effective and highly effective-rated teachers. While consensus was felt among the board to adhere to its goal of having an effective teacher in every classroom, the majority felt the fact find-er’s recommendations did not adequately reward those for performance.

Following the vote, Witt proposed a new compensation model which supports the board’s goal and rewards effectively-rated

Taking hobbies to the skyAnnual model air show moves to ArvadaBy Crystal [emailprotected]

Soaring across the sky at 200 mph, a model F9 Cougar jet flies vertically 2000 feet in the air before touching down at its landing point.

“I love flying and I love warbirds,” said J.D. Lavasseur, a model aircraft pilot.

Warbirds over the Rockies is a three-day model aviation event. Held Sept. 12-14, at the Arvada Modelers Airpark, 7608 Highway 93, the event will feature more than 150 pilots exhibiting and fly-ing model wartime aircraft.

“People should expect a lot of excite-ment,” said Brian O’Meara, organizer of the event. “Prepare to be amazed as you’ll see things you’ve never seen before.”

Hosted by the Arvada Associated Modelers, the event will showcase sev-eral different types of model airplanes or warbirds, such as the P51 Mustang, a Hawker Sea Fury, a T33 Jet, that were represented in various wars. Handcraft-ed by modelers across the world, these model planes were made to be near-ex-act replicas of the full-size planes used during a specific war.

“It’s a realistic simulation of air-planes you will never see in the air,” O’Meara said. “Many of these planes simply do not exist anymore.”

Along with the plane exhibitions,

pilots will have the opportunity to fly their planes across a 750 foot runway along six lanes with more than 250 acres of fly over space on three different fields. Daily, the event will host a full-size air show, air battle simulations and a brief history of military aviation from World War I, the Golden Age of Aviation in the 1930s, World War II and beyond.

A charitable event, Warbirds over the Rockies will donate a portion of the net proceeds to Mental Health America,

specifically Colorado chapter. In its eleventh year, the event, which was formerly held in Ault, Colorado, raised around $25,000 and continually draws in approximately 5,000 spectators from across the world.

“This is a very unique event,” said Joe Pirozzoli, director of public rela-tions for the Arvada Associated Model-ers. “This is something you would have to drive around 500 miles, easily, to see — and it’s in our backyard.”

The event costs $10 and is free for children 15 and under. Weekend passes and pilot fees are available online at http://warbirdsovertherockies.com/.

For modelers such as O’Meara and Lavasseur, once bitten, the passion for modeling never goes away.

“I watched airplanes all day long and just loved it,” he said. “Once you get bit by the model aviation bug, oh, you’ve been hit — it does not go away.”

Traveling at a speed of 200 mph, a F9 Cougar comes in for a landing at a previous Warbirds Over the Rockies event. Courtesy photo

Standing at attention a model B-26 Marauder weighs in at 110 pounds with a 12-foot wingspan.

Fire�ghting well doneArvada Fire Protection District receives national accreditationBy Crystal [emailprotected]

The Arvada Fire Protection District was accredited by the Commission on Fire Ac-creditation (CFAI) Aug. 14.

Two years ago, during an accreditation class at the Fire and Rescue International conference, Fire District Chief Jon Greer and now-Accreditation Manager Lt. Clay Steward decided to begin the accredita-tion process.

“It does two things. One, it ensures the public and our firefighters the ac-tions we’re taking and are going to take are proper for Arvada Fire Protection and its citizens,” Greer said. “The other, in my opinion, is that it places us among the top 160 departments in the country ... it gave us a focus on where to go with the next step and making us the best fire depart-ment there is.”

To achieve accreditation, agencies must follow four steps: become a reg-istered agency, apply for accreditation, perform a self-assessment, and then be reviewed by a peer assessment team that makes the final recommendation for ac-creditation.

“This is about defining who we are, how we operate and then building on that,” Steward said. “Educating everyone on who we are and what our standards are, getting the fire fighters on board and the staff online, and getting better — real-ly, to me, it’s all about the improvement.”

To help departments improve during the self-accreditation-assessment phase,

Arvada Fire Protection District Chief Jon Greer and Accreditation Manager, Lt. Clay Steward, stand, smiling after receiving accreditation, Aug. 13. Courtesy Photo — Arvada Fire Protection District

District continues on Page 5

Fact continues on Page 5

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2 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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The story of rest is the rest of the storyIt’s 7:20 p.m. and Sean is bent over

physics homework, graphs that show position and velocity in relation to time. Motion maps.

The work isn’t particularly difficult for him. The challenge is staying focused.

“The more I think,” he says, “the more irritated I feel.”

Sean is my 17-year-old son. He’s a high school senior and a good student.

But he’s tired.If you ask him what he looks forward

to on weekends, he’ll give you the same answer many teens do: Sleeping.

No wonder.Instead of the eight-and-a-half to nine-

and-a-half hours of sleep research has found teens need to perform at their best, Sean averages six to seven each night. Even though he sometimes slips into bed at 9:30 or 10, he usually can’t fall asleep until 11, and he’s at school most mornings by 5:45 for weight sessions with his base-ball team. Classes begin at 7:35.

We are a tired country.The Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention has called insufficient sleep a public health epidemic, noting in a 2009 study almost 38 percent of adults had un-intentionally fallen asleep during the day at least once in the preceding month and nearly 5 percent had fallen asleep while driving at least once during the same time period.

Scary. But not surprising.Like the one-third of adults in the

study, I, too, consistently sleep less than the recommended seven hours a day and often find myself longing for just a few minutes in which to rest my eyes.

The real calamity, though, is the sleep deprivation of our teenage children, who as a generation are losing the opportunity to achieve their highest potential, simply because they don’t have the few more hours needed to recharge.

“Sleep is absolutely vital, not just from

a physical standpoint, but from a mental, emotional and cognitive standpoint,” says Steve Portenga, a performance psy-chologist who teaches at the University of Denver and helps athletes, surgeons and others in high-risk occupations perform consistently at their highest levels.

A key element to that formula is sleep.Sean would agree.On days when he’s tired, “it’s hard to

focus. I just catch myself spacing,” he says. But when he feels rested, “it’s easier to participate in class — you feel more in it. It’s easier to comprehend and retain information … I’m just more aware, in general.”

Portenga talks about two studies that directly link sleep to performance.

In the first, two groups of people were given 12 hours to solve a difficult problem. One group received the problem in the morning, so didn’t sleep before resolving it that evening. The other group received it in the evening, so had the opportunity to sleep before coming up with an answer.

“Both had the same amount of time to solve it …” Portenga said, “but the ones who had a chance to sleep performed significantly better.”

In the second study, electrodes were connected to the brains of mice as they figured out a way through a maze. As the mice slept, researchers noted the same se-ries of connections firing as had occurred when they navigated the maze. The mice were replaying their route; the brain was moving information from short-term to

long-term memory, which makes retriev-ing information easier down the road.

The study showed, Portenga says, that “for consolidating learning, sleep is a re-ally vital process.”

With that knowledge in mind, the American Academy of Pediatrics, saying the average American teen is “chroni-cally sleep deprived and pathologically sleepy,” last week declared middle- and high-schoolers should begin their day at 8:30 a.m. at the earliest — essentially an hour later than most do now. Such a change would align with teens’ natural sleep cycles, which make it difficult for them — like Sean — to fall asleep before 11 p.m. And it would be key to helping “adolescents get the sleep they need to grow and learn.”

According to a National Sleep Foun-dation poll, 87 percent of high school students and 59 percent of sixth- through eighth-graders were sleeping less than the recommended eight-and-a-half to nine-and-a-half hours a night. Reasons range from sports, after-school activities, jobs and homework to over-active technology use.

The academy’s policy statement noted lack of sleep in teens not only translates to a decrease in learning and poorer grades, but also to more physical and mental health problems and an increased risk of car accidents.

Scary. But not surprising.Senior Craig Breuker can attest to the

positive impact of a later starting time.His first class this semester starts with

second period, which means he begins classes at 8:30. The difference from previ-ous years is stark.

“When I wake up, I just feel refreshed,” he says. “When I used to wake up at 6:30, I would always feel down and groggy. I haven’t had a morning where I feel like I want to go back to bed. When I get up, I’m ready for the day to start.”

He’s more focused. He has more energy later in the day. His eyes don’t get heavy.

An A and B student, Craig practices soccer after school until 5:15, then mows lawns until dusk, then finally heads home to do homework. If there’s time, he’ll watch some TV until turning off the lights at about 10:30.

Going to bed, he says, “is like a restart.”But considering only 15 percent of our

country’s high schools begin the day at 8:30 or later, Craig’s sense of rested well-being belongs to a minority of teens.

There is a long way to go.School district schedules are built

around a complexity of ingredients, from bus schedules to athletics to extracur-ricular activities, and a realignment of all those pieces would need buy-in from not only school officials, but also from parents and teens, themselves.

Until the paradigm shifts, until we are willing to take on the challenge — if we ever are — days for many teens will begin somewhat like this:

5 a.m. The first alarm goes off. Music blares. Sean reaches over and turns it off.

5:10 a.m. Music blares again. Unwill-ing to leave the warmth of his bed, Sean reaches over and sets a third alarm for 10 minutes later.

5:20 a.m. More music. Five more min-utes tick by and his feet hit the floor. He throws on a T-shirt, some shorts, shoes. Brushes his teeth. Washes his face.

He grabs a water bottle and heads out the door.

It is still dark, the notion of sleep al-ready forgotten.

Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. Her column earned first place in the 2013 Colorado Press Associa-tion Better Newspaper contest. She can be reached at [emailprotected] or 303-566-4110.

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Arvada Press 3September 4, 2014

Once you get the home you want under contract, you need to have it professional-ly inspected for hidden defects. Hopefully your agent has a list of several trusted inspectors to interview. When a new inspector asks to be among those I recom-mend to clients, I ask for a sample report and ask several qualifying questions. Hand written inspection re-ports and reports that utilize a simple checklist are not ac-ceptable. I want a narrative report, in which the inspector describes each discovered problem in his own words. The inspector should have a digital camera and include photos of each prob-lem next to his description of it. I like the report to be composed onsite and emailed to the client and me as a PDF the same day as the inspection. I want an inspector to have and use two important tools. One is a carbon monox-ide probe to use when inspecting forced air furnaces. This is how the inspector

can determine whether the all-important heat exchanger deep inside the unit might be cracked and emitting carbon monoxide into the home.

The second important tool is a device to detect moisture within walls. If you can see water stains on a wall or ceil-ing, this device can tell you whether there is moisture be-neath the surface. If there is no moisture detected, you’ll still want to get an explanation of the stains. A third device which I’ll start asking for is a black light for detecting pet urine within wall-

to-wall carpeting. Just last week a client closed on a home and hired a carpet cleaning company which, by using a black light, detected widespread pet urine in the basem*nt carpeting. The seller had not disclosed there was more than occa-sional pet presence in the house. If the inspector had used a black light during inspection, we could have made carpet replacement a key demand, but we didn’t.

One inspector I recommend frequently does have a black light, but inspecting for pet urine in carpets is beyond the scope of a normal inspection — which means you can’t assume he will test for it, you must specifically request it. Another item “beyond the scope” is the sprinkler system. If it is not winterized, this could be done in cooperation with the seller, or you could include in your in-spection notice, “Seller shall demonstrate to Buyer’s satisfaction that the sprinkler system is in working condition.” If it’s a warm day in the winter, you might be al-lowed to activate the system and then blow it out. Otherwise, you could put in the inspection notice that “Seller repre-sents that the sprinkler system is in work-ing condition.” You would have a basis, then, for requesting repairs in the spring.

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Mixed signals frustrate foes of death penaltyGovernor’s view on capital punishment was kept close to vestBy Vic [emailprotected]

Key Democratic lawmakers were frus-trated with Gov. John Hickenlooper’s guid-ance last year on a death penalty repeal bill and now feel that there was an opportu-nity lost, given that Hickenlooper’s stance against capital punishment is now known.

At the same time, Democrats believe that the governor’s “wrestling” on the issue was sincere and hold no resentment toward him for his limited involvement during the legislative process.

A sponsor of a bill that sought to end capital punishment in Colorado believes that the repeal effort would have passed had Hickenlooper come around on his an-ti-death penalty position sooner.

Hickenlooper — who had campaigned as a supporter of the death penalty in 2010 — acknowledged in an interview with KDVR-TV in August that his position has evolved over the years and that he now op-poses capital punishment.

But Hickenlooper wasn’t prepared to talk about those views in 2013, when Dem-ocrats were crafting a death penalty repeal bill.

Former Rep. Claire Levy, D-Boulder, a sponsor of the bill, said her effort was a “challenge” because of Hickenlooper’s lack of guidance on the legislation.

“It did it make it difficult for lawmakers who felt they may be vulnerable for repeal-ing the death penalty; difficult to make to make a commitment to me knowing the bill could be vetoed,” Levy said.

Levy said she had several conversations with Hickenlooper about the bill, but it wasn’t until just before the legislation was up for a committee hearing that he suggest-ed that might veto.

The bill died in the House Judiciary Committee on March 26, after the gover-nor’s feelings on the legislation became known.

“If (Hickenlooper) had arrived at his po-sition earlier, we would have all benefited because we would have known what to do,” said Rep. Daniel Kagan, D-Cherry Hills Village, the committee chairman who is against capital punishment. “He was wres-tling, no question about it.”

The repeal bill had Republican support as well, with Adams County Rep. Kevin Priola’s name appearing on the legislation. Priola had hoped the bill would also spark a conversation on abortion, which he op-poses.

“I wanted to have a discussion on state policy on the sanctity of life,” he said. “The state of Colorado needs to have a discus-sion of being pro-life in every way.”

With Priola’s support and the support of religious groups, Levy said she was op-

timistic about the bill’s chances of clearing the General Assembly, had Hickenlooper provided his support.

“We really did have a unique opportu-nity,” she said.

CNN interview surfacesWhile there was frustration with Hicken-

looper over his role in the death penalty re-peal bill, Democrats say they respected the governor’s decision-making process.

“While I really wanted a firm yes or no, I understand completely why he was not able to do that for us,” Levy said. “And I think the rea-son he couldn’t is really what he’s been say-ing publicly all along and that he’s really been wrestling with this issue.”

The death penalty issue made headlines again recently after a newly surfaced CNN interview from November became public. In the interview, Hickenlooper told a reporter that clemency for death row inmate Nathan Dunlap could still be on the table. Hickenlooper granted Dunlap an indefinite reprieve in May 2013.

Hickenlooper’s campaign said that in the CNN interview, the governor was re-sponding to a hypothetical question, and that Dunlap — who killed four people at an Aurora Chuck E. Cheese’s restaurant in 1993 — will die in prison.

Even though Kagan would have liked to have seen Hickenlooper support last year’s death penalty repeal, he was OK with how the governor handled the Dunlap situation.

“I respect the position he arrived at in the end,” Kagan said. “He said he’s not go-ing to decide for an entire state on this is-sue, instead he said, `I cannot, in good conscience, be the one to sign the death warrant.’”

But Republicans have blasted Hicken-looper over his evolution on the death pen-alty and for his “indecision and weak lead-ership” on the issue.

“On my watch, justice will carried out, the laws of the state of Colorado will be enforced and I will never turn my back on the victims,” said former Congressman Bob Beauprez, who is running against Hicken-looper in this fall’s gubernatorial election.

Rep. Mark Waller, R-Colorado Springs, a former House minority leader, said the death penalty is just one example where Hickenlooper has been hesitant to “weigh in on legislation unless he absolutely has to.”

“He never lets you know what his posi-tion is,” Waller said. “It’s like he lets the issue lead him.”

But Democrats, for all their frustrations, say Hickenlooper’s “thoughtful” approach to painful, moral decisions on issues like the death penalty is better than the alterna-tive.

“When somebody is so completely glib and saying, `Oh, I would put someone to

death if I were in charge,’ that reflects to me a lack of depth, a lack of appreciation of the enormity of the decision you’re making,” Levy said.

Kagan agrees.“I will never knock a man who follows

his conscience before taking a politically expedient position,” he said.

CapitolReport

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4 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

Stop by our Colorado Commu nity Media booth at the Arvada Harvest Festival

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print!!!!!!

Waller denounces candidate’s anti-gay comments By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

Former House Minority Leader Mark Waller on Aug. 27 blasted the fellow Re-publican who is seeking to

succeed him over his recent “horribly inappropriate” anti-gay comments.

Waller, who is not seek-ing re-election for his Colo-rado Springs-based House District 15 seat, also told Colorado Community Me-dia that Gordon Klingen-schmitt’s candidacy “cer-tainly does have an impact” on other races on the fall ballot.

When reached for com-ment, Klingenschmitt said he takes no issue with Waller’s comments and apologized for what led to Waller’s admonishment.

Klingenschmitt, who is a chaplain, made na-tional headlines earlier in the week for comments he made in a mass-distributed email. Klingenschmitt sug-gested that Democratic U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, who

is gay, wants to kill Chris-tians, much like the Islamic extremist group who was responsible for beheading a U.S. journalist earlier in August.

“Democrats like Polis want to bankrupt Chris-tians who refuse to worship and endorse his sodomy,” he wrote. “Next he’ll join ISIS in beheading Chris-tians, but not just in Syria, right here in America.”

Waller said his “11-year-old son can identify that as a hateful speech.”

“I think it was horri-bly inappropriate to say,” Waller said. “It doesn’t mat-ter if he’s a person running for state representative or a person on the street. I think it’s terrible to say.

“Obviously, he does not speak for me or the Repub-lican Party.”

Waller hasn’t endorsed Klingenschmitt, but he wouldn’t go as far as say-ing that he should drop out of the race — as Klingen-schmitt’s opponent, Demo-crat Lois Fornander has.

“If you’re not voting for him, you’re voting for the Democrat and quite hon-estly legislative majorities matter,” Waller said. “But that puts (House District 15 voters) in a rock and a hard place in terms of who to vote for.”

House District 15 is heavily Republican and Klingenschmitt is still fa-vored to win, in spite of his recent comments.

Klingenschmitt apolo-gized earlier in the week and did so again during a phone interview. He said he was trying to point out the “bad policies of Jared Po-

lis,” but that he realizes his comments were offensive.

Klingenschmitt has tak-en issue with Polis’ backing of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. He said the legislation should have religious exceptions.

“I apologize for the hy-perbole and I wrote that statement when I was tired between 1 and 2 in the morning, but I do not apol-ogize for defending Chris-tians for persecution.”

When asked if it dawned on him that he was using language that has histori-cally been used to perse-cute gays while trying to defend Christians from “persecution,” Klingen-schmitt said, “I don’t accept the premise of the ques-tion.”

Klingenschmitt said he hopes voters will see past

his comments.“I’m a fi rst-time candi-

date and I am new at this,” he said. “I made a mistake, and I won’t always say the right thing, but I do have a backbone and I will always stand on conviction.”

Waller wasn’t the only Republican to denounce Klingenschmitt’s com-ments. Owen Loftus, a spokesman for the Colo-rado Republican Party, said that Klingenschmitt’s “comments in no way re-fl ect the views of the party.”

House Speaker Mark Ferrandino, D-Denver, who is gay, said Klingen-schmitt’s comments were “hom*ophobic, extreme and slanderous.”

Mascot bill would defer to Indian panels By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

The debate over the use of American Indian mascots will come to the state Capitol next year.

State Rep. Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, is expected to carry a bill that could result in schools losing their mascots — or even losing state funding.

And the effort is sure to result in a vibrant pub-lic meeting on Salazar’s bill, which is scheduled for Sept. 10.

Salazar said his bill would require schools that receive state funding and that wish to have Indian-themed mascots to fi rst get the OK from represen-tatives of American Indian communities.

Salazar said the Colorado Commission of In-dian Affairs could be in charge of making those de-cisions, or perhaps another commission would be created by lawmakers, who return to the Capitol in January.

If schools don’t go before an Indian commis-sion, Salazar said his legislation would still allow the schools to continue to use their mascots — but at a steep price.

“If they don’t want to reach out, they can use the mascot, but they don’t get state funding,” he said. “They are able to exercise their First Amendment rights, but as a state we don’t have to participate in their discriminatory conduct.”

There is an ongoing national debate over the use of Indian-themed mascots, one that has cen-tered on the NFL’s Washington Redskins.

Opponents of Washington’s mascot want it done away with because they feel it is a deroga-tory term that is akin to any other racial slur. The debate has led some NFL announcers and news organizations to move away from using the term “Redskins.”

Others blast the movement as political correct-ness gone too far and say that the mascots are not

racist, but rather pay homage to American Indian culture and history.

“They don’t get to make that justifi cation,” Sala-zar said of that argument. “It’s the American Indian community that gets to decide if it’s racist to them. They can’t just say, ̀ I don’t think it’s racist, so it’s not racist.’ You don’t get to decide.”

The issue will be discussed at a public meet-ing that is scheduled to be held at the Denver In-dian Family Resource Center, 4407 Morrison Road, from 4:30-7 p.m. on Sept. 10.

There, Salazar will also talk about another piece of legislation that is of interest to the American In-dian community — his revival of a bill that would allow out-of-state American Indian students to at-tend Colorado colleges at in-state tuition rates, so long as they have ties to Colorado tribes.

That legislation died in a committee hearing earlier this year.

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Arvada Press 5September 4, 2014

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Technical subjects – science, technology, engineering and math – are increasingly important to study in today’s evolving world. These subjects open the doors for careers such as engineering, which presents both creative and technical challenges. As an engineer, I’m proud to be building bus rapid transit (BRT) along the US 36 corridor between Denver and Boulder. Improving our transit system and solving problems – it’s all in a day’s work for me.

– Svetlana Grechka Senior Engineer, RTD FasTracks

I’m an engineer.I’m an education advocate. I am FasTracks.I am RTD.

rtd-denver.com

RTD FasTracks is one of the largest transit expansion programs in the nation. FasTracks is adding more rail, improved bus service, more parking, and new transit hubs to make your transportation options even better.

organizations scrutinize things such as response time, safety, fi nancial, main-tenance, communications, training and human resources — striving to meet at least 88 of 241 criteria in 10 different cat-egories.

“The sense of it all, really, they (the Arvada Fire Protection District) felt they needed to share their story,” said Karl Ris-tow, CFAI program director. “They chose to do this and to tell the community they are a modern fi re department.”

Annually, approximately 20-25 new departments are accredited with the or-ganization. According to the 2012 census by the National Fire Department, 26, 482

departments are registered, and as of Au-gust, only 201 were accredited.

“I did a lot of capturing that data,” Steward said. “But it’s what they do every day that actually makes us credible, It’s what we do, not this document, not this process. We were credible prior; we just proved it.”

The fi re protection district will main-tain accreditation for the next fi ve years. Annually the department will need to submit a report, detailing the work done within a stratiegic plan to maintain and improve district practices.

“Where we’re going now is well-de-fi ned,” Greer said. “It will make sure, for the citizens, the fi refi ghters and everyone involved that Arvada Fire is going to con-tinually reassess themselves and make sure we’re providing the level of service that’s right for Arvada.”

Continued from Page 1

Districtteachers for performance.

Witt’s model (www.boarddocs.com) would raise the base pay for full time teachers to $38,000 to be more competi-tive with other districts; give bonuses in lieu of salary increases to “effective teachers” with higher base salaries; and provide a 50 percent higher compensa-tion increase for highly effective teach-ers than those of effectively-rated teach-ers.

“It’s very important as a district and an organization that performance means something,” Witt said. “It is fair we move forward with a comp system that rewards all of our teachers and puts

performance as a key component of that system, that’s critically important to me.”

With the rejection of the fact-finding agreement, the board now has full power to resolve the issues at hand, according to the current contract with the associa-tion.

According to Lorie Gillis, the district’s chief financial officer, the proposed compensation changes, is not some-thing they could do as a “turn of a key” and would take months to figure out.

“This is not something we could do for even an October paycheck ... pay needs to be accurate,” she said.

Moving forward, the district’s finan-cial and human resources departments will work on calculating the numbers for the proposed pay scale and will present them at a later meeting.

Continued from Page 1

Fact

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6 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

It’s time for the ARVADA PRESS

4th, 5th & 6th Graders

ENTER TODAY!

Essay Contest

Arvada Harvest Festival Spelling Bee Arvada Harvest Festival Spelling Bee Sponsored by the Arvada Press

Open to all students in Grades 4, 5 or 6. Sat, Sept. 6, 2014 at the McIlvoy Park Pavilion, beginning at 1:00 p.m.

Go to our website to enter: www.ArvadaPress.com

Essay Contest Sponsored by the Arvada Junior Chamber Foundation’s program – Star Spangled ScholarsThe Star Spangled Banner turns 200 years old this year! Tell us how the words of our National Anthem still apply

to American life today – especially yours!

Please submit your typed, double-spaced, entry to: The Arvada Junior Chamber Foundation, c/o Linda Olson Ferguson, 5640 Yukon, Arvada, CO 80002.

2 age groups: grades 6-8 and 9-12. Entries must be postmarked by Friday, August 29, 2014.

Prizes for both contests include:Arvada Army Surplus gift certificates • Fuzzy’s Tacos gift certificates

Free glow-in-the-dark mini golf at Putting Edge in Colorado Mills • Cash prizes from Sooper Credit Union

Analysis: Attack ad may pass Hickenlooper Governor hard to hit as economy booms By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

An attack ad released against Gov. John Hickenlooper last week started out like any other negative ad — grainy, black-and-white footage followed by a series of assaults on the governor for his failure to “make the tough decisions.”

The ad, which was paid for by the Re-publican Governors Association, included footage of Hickenlooper recently playing pool with President Obama at a downtown Denver bar.

It goes on to show footage of shots taken by a really bad pool player — who is sym-bolically Hickenlooper — as a narrator rattles off a laundry list of attacks on the governor’s record.

“Colorado’s been hustled enough,” the narrator says, before going on to tout Hick-enlooper’s opponent this fall, Republican former Congressman Bob Beauprez.

Almost immediately after the ad was re-leased, Hickenlooper fi red back with an ad of his own, one that was brutally … posi-tive?

“Four years ago, we promised to run a positive campaign, and we did,” said Hick-enlooper, looking right into the camera.

Hickenlooper then spends the next 30 seconds talking about how much the econ-omy has improved under his watch and how communities are rebounding after

fl oods ravaged parts of the state last year.Hickenlooper made no reference to

Beauprez in the ad. Nor has he done so in any other ad or campaign press release.

The Beauprez camp, meanwhile, has at-tacked Hickenlooper every chance it’s had: “Flip-fl ops” on the death penalty; his “out of touch” gun-control agenda; and any-thing else they think will stick.

So far, it has been a story of two cam-paign strategies: one that fi res away and reloads versus one that ducks the bullets and smiles.

“They want to paint Hickenlooper as bumbling or indecisive, but they’ve got to do something because Hickenlooper is not the easiest guy to attack, in part because people like him,” said John Straayer, a po-litical science professor at Colorado State University.

“But if they get too nasty, it could have a boomerang effect.”

Hickenlooper has pledged to run only positive campaigns in his political career and, so far, that strategy has paid divi-dends.

But what happens if the going gets tough for a governor who isn’t used to throwing a punch?

“What if someone keeps taking a base-ball bat to you and all of the sudden you fi nd yourself down in the polls, then what do you do?” said Norman Provizer, a politi-cal science professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

`Both Ways Bob’ ad hurtNegative campaign attacks are as old

as politics itself. And some of the most ef-fective political ads have been mercilessly negative.

“People do not like negative advertis-ing; at the same time, it has an impact on people,” Provizer said.

Beauprez is no stranger to the impact negative attacks can have on a campaign. His failed 2006 gubernatorial campaign was derailed in part by attacks — started by a fellow Republican — that labeled him “Both Ways Bob” on key issues.

For this campaign, Beauprez, through stump speeches, campaign statements and through outside political groups, has been trying to label Hickenlooper as a failed leader who fl ip-fl ops on issues.

“We intend to present the contrast be-tween John Hickenlooper’s failed leader-ship and Bob’s plan for Colorado,” said Beauprez communications director Allen Fuller, defending the campaign’s attacks.

Fuller also said voters shouldn’t be bam-boozled into thinking that Hickenlooper is merely taking the high road whenever at-tacks come his way.

“We’ve all read the blueprint, that Hick-enlooper is running a positive campaign,” he said. “Coloradans are going to get the joke ... knowing full well that the Demo-cratic Party and a host of blue groups are hitting back.”

Eddie Stern, a spokesman for the Hick-enlooper campaign, said he isn’t concerned about attacks from Beauprez sticking and resonating in the voters’ minds while the governor runs a positive campaign.

“We don’t think Colorado needs more negative campaigning or angry politics,”

Stern said.Provizer said he understands why those

who want to see Hickenlooper lose are tempted to run attack ads.

“The simple reality is, the incumbent has a record,” he said. “When you’ve been in power and done things, you’re going to have issues there that are a reality. But at some point (the other side) also has to come back with what it is going to do.”

Straayer said that those who are out to defeat Hickenlooper are piling on as many issues as they can, seeing as how the eco-nomic outlook in Colorado has been on the upswing in recent years.

“The economy is strong, so what are you going to do?” Straayer said. “To say he’s got a failed governorship and look at the shape the state’s in, it just doesn’t sell very well in the trajectory of the economy. So what do you do? You jump on misstatements and on the death penalty.”

But polls over the summer have shown that Beauprez and Hickenlooper are locked in a tight race. And observers won-der if Hickenlooper will change his tone in October, if polls still show a close contest.

They also wonder if Hickenlooper is even capable of turning into an attack dog.

“When he’s run before, it’s been posi-tive, good-humored and quirky, but honest and straightforward, and that’s who he is as a candidate,” Provizer said. “He would have a harder time going negative because that’s a real contradiction of what people think he is, and suddenly turning into a pit bull may not work.”

JEFFCO NEWS IN A HURRY Women’s Su� rage to Parity

The League of Women Voters of Jefferson County will discuss improve-ments to women’s parity at this Sept. 9-11 unit meetings. In the foothills area, the League will meet from 9:15 to 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Highland Rescue Team Ambulance Service, 317 S. Lookout Mountain Road, Golden 80401. Call Janet

at 303-674-7755 for more information.A second meeting on the same topic

will be 9:15 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 at the Cason-Howell House, 1575 Kipling, Lake-wood 80215. Call Lynne at 303-985-5128 for more information on this meeting.

For those unable to attend a daytime meeting, the League has an evening meet-ing available. For more information, call 303-238-0032 or visit www.lwvjeffco.org.

MAVEN Mission update at Lookout Mountain Nature Center

Lockheed Martin Propulsion Engineer, JPL Solar System Ambassador, and MSL descent stage engineer Adam Pender will be discussing Mars Atmosphere and Vola-tile Evolution mission (MAVEN) launched on Nov. 18, during a special presentation on Friday, Sept. 12.

Participants can fi nd out what’s new and what has been learned so far from the Mars mission. Ages 10 years to adult can attend for free. Event starts at 7 pm. at Lookout Mountain Nature Center & Preserve on 910 Colorow Road, Golden, CO 80401.

Call 720-497-7600 for more informa-tion and space availability.

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (7)

Arvada Press 7September 4, 2014

For tax planning, tax preparation and financial advice

Coet2, Certified Public Accountants

Continuing the Coet2 Financial TutorialsThis series of free sessions is structured to familiarized business pros and the public with the important topics of retirement, troubleshooting your

financial statements, plus more!

Serving happy and satisfied clients in Westminster and Colorado for more than 25 years!

The Coet2 Financial Tutorial, Sept. 18, 4:30-6:30 p.m., at the offices of Coet2 CPAs, 10875 Dover St., Suite 400, in Westminster is the third in a series. This month’s installment will focus on the things you need to know about

Business Exit Strategies and the kind of response you might receive if you want to sell

your business. Public invited! Enjoy a light meal and avoid rush-hour traffic! All sessions are independent

of each other – so jump in at any time. RSVP: 303-426-6444.

Coet2 Financial Tutorials calendar at

www.coet2.com

at 7310 W 52nd Ave. in Arvada

HALLOWEEN COSTUMEUNVEILING EVENT9am on Saturday, September 6th

1000s OF UNIQUE COSTUMESbefore we open at 9

+ Free donuts & coffee

GMO labeling measure heading for fall ballot Similar measure failed a� er � ght in California By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

A backer of a ballot measure that would require labels on foods that are genetically modifi ed said his effort is about allowing Coloradans to “make informed decisions about what we are feeding our families.”

But opponents fear that Proposition 105 is unnecessary and would result in confu-sion and higher food costs.

The Secretary of State’s Offi ce an-nounced Aug. 20 that proposition back-ers had collected the necessary number of valid signatures for it to become one of only four measures to make the November ballot this year.

The proposition addresses foods de-

rived from genetically modifi ed organ-isms, or GMOs. GMOs are found in the vast majority of common crop foods, including soybeans, corn and canola. GMO-based foods have been sold commercially since the mid-1990s.

The scientifi c consensus is that foods that contain GMOs are currently not harm-ful to the public’s health or the environ-ment. But that hasn’t curbed a GMO-label-ing movement that has resulted in similar ballot measures and several legislative ef-forts around the country.

“I think there’s momentum,” said Larry Cooper, of Arvada. Cooper is behind the Colorado Right to Know campaign and was responsible for putting the measure on the ballot.

“People in Colorado really enjoy a healthy lifestyle, and that’s why we work here,” he said. “But, really, what’s going on is we are choosing our food blindly.”

Some major chains have already been moving toward Cooper’s side on this is-sue. Whole Foods grocery stores are in the process of labeling all foods that contain GMOs. And foods that are used at Colora-do-based Chipotle Mexican Grill restau-rants contain no GMOs.

But Cooper knows he has a fi ght on his hands this fall. The packaged-food indus-try has already been pushing back against GMO-labeling efforts in other states, in-cluding California, where a similar ballot measure failed two years ago.

Opponents of Cooper’s effort insist they have science on their side. They point to independent studies that have not indi-cated any detrimental health impacts as a result of GMO consumption. And they say that advancements in biotechnology are good because they allow farmers to grow more and feed more people without hav-ing a greater environmental or health im-

pact.Critics also say that, if the measure

passes, food prices would go up and label-ing foods that contain GMOs would only confuse consumers, who have long been eating the foods without — they say — any problems.

But Cooper dismisses those concerns.“I really can’t understand how it would

(raise food prices),” Cooper said. “Obvi-ously, they can choose to raise prices, but the bottom line is all they have to do is put a label on them. It’s not a ban.”

Cooper is not a doctor or a scientist. He said he is “a grandpa who got involved” because he is concerned about what his grandchildren are eating.

The way he fi gures it, if there’s no prob-lem with GMO-based food, what’s the big deal if the ballot measure passes?

“If GMOs are safe, then why not just la-bel them?” he said.

ARVADA NEWS IN A HURRY

Harvest FestivalThe 2014 Harvest Festival kicks off

Friday, Sept. 5, with a concert by the Mile High Fife and Drum Corps.

In it’s 89th year, the 2014 Arvada Harvest Festival is Celebrating America’s Pioneer West, through Sunday, Sept. 7, in Olde Town Arvada. Along with the con-cert, the festival will feature a parade, 9/11 Remembrance Run, food and garden fair, interactive kids zone, midway and more.

Started in October, 1925 as a celebra-tion of the fi rst paved road connecting Arvada to Denver in the festival has been held every year since, save six, due to war, illness or weather.

For more information on specifi c events, see our Festival Guide or visit www.arvadaharvestfestivalparade.com.

Community development block grantFunding for services who wish to pro-

vide affordable housing is now available through the Community Development

Block Grant program.The program provides grant money to

cities and counties to help them develop more affordable housing options in their communities.

Applications are available online via http://arvada.org/about-arvada/commu-nity-development-block-grant-program/ and are due Sept. 10, 2014.

Senior carnival To celebrate the opening of the Clare

Bridge Memory Wing, the Sterling House of Arvada will host a senior carnival and funfair.

Held 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 6, the event will feature a variety of games and food, a bouncy castle and slide, a dunk tank and more. A fundraiser, all proceeds from the event will benefi t the Alzheimer’s Association.

For more information or to reserve a spot, contact Dave Pierson or Lauren Connelly at 303-423-8100.

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8 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

OPINIONY O U R S & O U R S

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

722 Washington Ave, Unit 210 Golden, CO 80401

Mailing address: 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Phone: 303-566-4100 Fax: 303-279-7157 On the Web: ArvadaPress.com

Get Social with us

We welcome event listings and other submissions.

News and Business Press Releases Please visit ArvadaPress.com, click on the Submit Your News tab and choose a category from the drop down menu.

Calendar [emailprotected]

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To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

Columnists and Guest Commentaries

The Arvada Press features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Arvada Press.

Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

Email letters to [emailprotected]

A publication of

Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the

community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone.

Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries...

If it happens, it’s news to us.

Please share by contacting us [emailprotected],

and we will take it from there.

A�er all, the Press is your paper.

GERARD HEALEY

MIKKEL KELLY

GLENN WALLACE

CRYSTAL ANDERSON

VIC VELA

RON MITCHELL

GINO GRASSO

ERIN ADDENBROOKE

AUDREY BROOKS

SCOTT ANDREWS

SHARI MARTINEZ

President

Publisher and Editor

Assistant Editor

Community Editor

State Desk and Legislative Editor

Local Sales Manager

Marketing Consultant

Major Accounts and Classi�ed Manager

Business Manager

Production Manager

Circulation Manager

Proper peer pressure promotes performanceSometimes just the words “peer pres-

sure” spark anxious, judgmental, and negative feelings. Especially when we attach verbs such as “succumbing to” or “giving in to” peer pressure.

And many times we direct our guid-ance of avoiding peer pressure to the young adults, teenagers and children in our lives. No doubt there are more temptations and access to trouble now than in any previous generation. So our advice and steering to avoid peer pressure has never been more valuable, as long as it doesn’t fall on deaf ears or comes across as, “Well when I was your age … ,” because that never goes well. Or if it sounds over-played like, “If all of your friends jumped off of the top of the mountain would you follow too?” Yikes!

Avoiding peer pressure can be turned from a negative to a positive as we encour-age those that look up to us with confi-dence boosters and nurturing self-esteem building words and actions. You know how it goes, when we tell or ask someone not to do something, especially our youth, what do they do? Exactly what we told them or asked them not to do. Having open dialogues can be revealing about previous errors in judgment or examples where peers may have misled us, or per-haps we were the peer misleading others.

As my friend Bert reminded me last week, sometimes when we think we are following, we could actually also be in a position of leading all of those who are following us too.

Another awesome and positive side of peer pressure is playing itself out right now before our very eyes, ears, and through our contributions. I am talking about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. If you haven’t seen this yet or heard of it, the challenge has gone absolutely viral. People have been challenged to fill a bucket with water and ice and then dump the bucket over their head or have a family member or friend participate and tip the ice-filled bucket onto their head. Then each participant that has accepted the challenge gets to challenge others in their circle of friends, associates, or family to take the same challenge.

Now if they don’t take the challenge and want to avoid the fleeting moment of freezing water spilling over their head and body, they can elect to make a donation to ALS. And in some cases I know people that have done both, accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and also made a nice financial contribution to ALS.

And it’s not just ALS, just look at all the fundraisers for breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, SMA, diabetes, and so many oth-

ers and include events like 5K runs, walks, auctions, golf tournaments where we sign up to sponsor runners, walkers, golfers, and place our names on those silent auc-tion sheets, all for the greater good. And you know how it goes, sometimes we are on the fence of whether or not we will participate or sponsor someone, and then one of our friends, one of our peers does it and before we know it we have jumped in as well. And that is just incredible.

Peer pressure in business is also ex-tremely positive. There is nothing better than some healthy and friendly competi-tion. As a salesman I was always interested in how well my peers were doing. I used their productivity as a motivator to try and beat them the next day, week, or month. And it went both ways, my lifelong friend and fellow salesman would always contact me just to see what I sold that day so we could compete the following day.

So the next time we feel like cringing when we hear the words “peer pressure,” just remember it can absolutely be lever-aged as a positive influence in our lives and not always a negative. How about you? Have you had a positive experience with peer pressure? I would love to hear all about it at [emailprotected], and when we focus on the positive peer pres-sure in our lives it really will be a better than good week.

Michael Norton is the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation, a strategic con-sultant and a business and personal coach.

What book-to-movie are you most excited to see?

We asked people at Anythink York in Thornton and around the area what book-into-movie or TV show they were most excited to see.

“The Maze Runner” — I need to see that right now. The books are awesome and the movie looks really good. It has some good people in it.

Michelle HawkinsThornton

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

“The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1” It was a thrilling book and so far the mov-ies have been too. They’ve been better than I expected.

Michelle BarringerUnincorporated

Adams County

I can’t wait until December when the new “Hobbit” movie comes out. I think the whole series has been beautifully �lmed.

Kathy TottenLittleton

I’m waiting for the “Game of Thrones” season �ve, it’s going to be very exciting.

Heather McCuistionThornton

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and cultural events are happening in your area and the areas around you? Visit our website at www.coloradocommunitymedia.com/calendar.

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (9)

Arvada Press 9September 4, 2014

OBITUARIES

Theda June Adams, 91, died on August 22 in her Arvada home attended by her three daughters. Services will be held Friday, Sept 5, at 2:00 pm at Arvada Presbyterian Church, 5592 Indepen-dence St., Arvada, with a reception following at the church.

Theda was born June 4, 1923 in Springfield, Colorado, the first of two daughters. She married Dale H. Adams on Febru-ary 14, 1943. The Adams family moved to Arvada in 1959. They were ac-tive members of Arvada Presbyterian Church. A fuller life review is at www.coloradocrematory.com.

Theda is preced-ed in death by her husband, parents, sister, and one grandchild.

She is survived by her three

daughters, Susan J. Phil-lips (Denver), Kathleen Adams (Lakewood) and Cynthia J. Oury (Arvada), her son-in-law, Leo R. Oury, eight grandchildren, and three great-grandchil-dren. She is also survived by nieces and nephews and her cousin, Reba Snyder.

Memorial donations may be made to Arvada Community Food Bank, 7555 W. 57th Ave, Arvada CO 80002, or Family HomeStead, PO Box 40186, Denver CO 80204.

ADAMSTheda June Adams

June 4, 1923 – Aug. 22, 2014

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A book for my birthday Recently while traveling in Dublin,

Ireland, I learned that James Joyce chose his birthday for the release of his novel “Finnegan’s Wake.”

“If James Joyce can use his birthday as a deadline, so can I!” Using a saddlebag full of my spotty logic I knew it was time to launch the book by my birthday in November. Yes, it will be a double celebra-tion.

Books are not released these days they are “launched.” I’ve worked on my book over a year, a patchwork memoir originally composed of my best personal columns from the last 40 years that tell stories about my life. But then I added new stories about my life before I settled down to writing columns. I wrote about my exciting teenage years competing in rodeos because that is when my adrenalin was fl owing at its highest.

I couldn’t leave out the part about working in Hollywood in the fi lm business and encountering movie stars like Warren Beatty, George C. Scott, Clint Eastwood — on movie sets or in their homes. Aha!

writing about them — great experiences a young woman in her twenties and grist for this writer fi nishing a memoir. This part was a kick to write.

So the my manuscript got much better, I’m hearing things from my marketing and website person, “What’s your brand, Mary?”

I picture a brand on the rear end of a cow, at least that’s what it meant when I grew up around animals. “Double Bar K” I say.

“What’s the K for?” she asks?”“K is for Kick ass!”“No,” she says. “Your brand in one word

or phrase tells who you are!”“But I am many people in the book,” I

say. “It moves chronologically: teenage ro-deo champion, movie actress, mom rais-ing two kids, woman alone after marriage breaks up, woman happily remarried late in life.” I add, “Through it all I wrote col-umns locally and in the Chicago Tribune, and two mystery novels on the side. And I have to get it down to one brand?”

“Yes, defi ne yourself.”“Kickass.”“Let’s think on that one,” she says.There is an ocean of difference be-

tween writing a book and launching a book. Since I grew up in the Space Age the fi rst thought that comes to mind about launching is Cape Canaveral and rockets, even spaceships full of astronauts heading for the moon. Webster says launch means to “hurl or send forth with some force.” Also launch means “to start something new.”

So this morning, I woke up at 2 a.m. picturing my book shooting into space. “No wait,” I said to my husband who was

asleep. “I’d rather go with the other mean-ing of launch which is to slide a new vessel into the water.”

“Sure, sure,” he mumbled and turned over.

If I’m pregnant with a book, honestly that’s what it feels like, it’s my baby. It might be bald or pudgy but it’s mine.

I text the marketing person. “Can we launch my baby, I mean my book in the bathtub?”

She writes back. She’s up all night too. ‘No, no ... in a cloud an internet cloud, Twitter and Facebook, YouTube.”

This will be fun, but for me it’s like go-ing to the moon, the territory completely unknown. What will feel like and what will be the results?

Mary Stobie will launch her memoir in November. It will hurl through space or sail on the back of rubber ducky in the bathtub. If you want to be on the email list for the launch party, or want to compare notes about writing your own book please write to [emailprotected].

How do you go from a � rst date to falling in love? You may know it’s not easy to meet

someone new who romantically interests you, especially if you are over 40. You also may know that it is diffi cult to connect, bond, deepen a relationship and fall in love — even when you do fi nd a promising romantic partner.

So how do you go from a fi rst date to falling in love? There is no fail-safe, reli-able manual for how to do that, but I will offer some suggestions.

First, pay close attention to how you approach an initial encounter with someone. Are you looking for reasons to say “yes” or for reasons to say “no?” Do you tend to focus on what you’re attracted to, or what you’re not attracted to? You want to be careful so you don’t throw away someone who is promising, because promising opportunities do not come along all that often. That being said, elimi-nate anyone who is currently in a serious relationship, who is on the rebound and wants to talk about their ex, and anyone who is not emotionally or physically avail-able for a relationship at this time. You’re not looking for potential — you want someone who is available.

Second, be willing to open up and

reveal yourself. Don’t be emotionally hidden, superfi cial or fearful of letting someone else in. It is far better to risk getting hurt or rejected then to play it too safe, and it is far better to risk your heart than not to. If you don’t do this, you will not fall in love.

Third, be willing to do the hard work all successful relationships require: identify when there’s a problem or an irritation in a timely manner, and do everything you can to work through the confl ict in such a way that both of you feel valued and respected. Get comfortable with the skills needed to resolve confl icts effectively. You can’t have a good relationship without them.

Fourth, whenever you possibly can, make important to you what is important to your partner. It conveys openness and

respect, and it will make him or her feel valued by you — and to refuse to do this is tantamount to telling your partner that s/he isn’t important to you, or that his/her wishes, needs and desires don’t matter to you.

Fifth, when someone becomes impor-tant to you, communicate how important s/he is to you through your words, your deeds and your touch.

Sixth, you must listen without inter-rupting, you must be able to hear even when your partner says something to you that you don’t like, and you must be able to hear everything, even criticism, without strong reaction or defensiveness. You also have to be able to tell how you feel even when you know your partner isn’t going to have a good response.

Seventh, make your partner a top priority. Don’t be so preoccupied that you treat other things as more important than

your relationship, and don’t be so ex-hausted that you cannot consistently offer quality time and presence.

Finally, You are more likely to get the relationship you want if you refuse to give up. You can’t hit a home run unless you’re in the game. Actively stay in the game. That means keeping your mental and emotional attitude hopeful and optimistic, and not letting yourself become cynical, jaded, mistrusting or negative.

Neil Rosenthal is a licensed marriage and family therapist in Westminster and Boulder, Colorado. His column is in it’s 23rd year of publication, and is syndicated around the world. You can reach him at (303)758-8777, or email him through his website: www.heartrelationships.com. He is the author of the new book: “Love, Sex and Staying Warm: Keeping the Flame Alive”.

Get your hunting story straight

We are peeking around the corner and seeing fall fast approaching. The Broncos have been on the practice fi eld for weeks, and hunters have received their April big game license (or rejection) in the mail and all leftover licenses have been allocated to hunters on a fi rst come, fi rst served basis.

These are the fi rst early, critical and time-sensitive hunt planning steps for outdoors sportsmen and women. But there is work ahead for both the seasoned hunter and the novice. The novice can always use extra help, and this is where the Division of Parks and Wildlife’s annual Game Hunting Stories are truly valuable.

The division (CPW) provides an an-nual “story package” for the fall big-game hunting season. There are 25 different stories containing valuable big-game hunting information and suggestions, all written by the CPW professional staff. The writers are big-game managers, biolo-gists, law enforcement staff, planners, public information offi cers and a variety of other technical personnel. All stories are easily accessible online by searching at cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/BigGame-HuntingStories.aspx. Photos that support the stories can be found online as well at http://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/Pho-toGallery.aspx.

The stories include Know the Rules and

Your Limits; Be Sure You Know Where You are Hunting; Hunting Ethically; Hunting Gear Checklist; Common Hunting Viola-tions Can be Costly; Pronghorn Provide Unique Hunting Challenge and Some Pri-vate Ranches Open to Hunters. The other 17 stories contain equally helpful big-game hunting information that will help a hunt be more safe and productive.

The links also provide names and tele-phone numbers of regional public-infor-mation offi cers who can provide specifi c regional information. Northeast region PIO is Jennifer Churchill, 303-291-7234; Southwest region PIO Joe Lewandowski, 970-375-6708; Northwest region Mike Por-ras, 970-255-6162; Southeast region PIO Abbie Walls, 719-227-5211

Outdoors writer Ron Hellbusch can be reached at [emailprotected].

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (10)

10 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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Starting early on the slopes Colorado Ski and Golf kicks o� sale and junior trade-in Crystal [emailprotected]

Believe it or not, snow has already be-gun to dust the high country.

With the ski season swiftly approaching, skiers and riders across the state are gear-ing up, and retailers are prepping to make sure skiers of all ages have the right gear.

Since 1983, Colorado Ski and Golf, 7715 Wadsworth Blvd., has offered the Junior-Trade In program to help introduce kids of all ages to winter sports, such as skiing and snowboarding. The program gives parents the opportunity to purchase gear and les-sons for their children at discounted prices throughout the season.

“I was in it when I was a kid,” said Elliot Freedman, manager of Colorado Ski and Golf. “It’s a way for parents to get their kids in equipment without breaking the bank.”

With the trade-in program, parents can buy full new or used gear packages, which include skis, boots and bindings, for use throughout the season for under $200. As an incentive to continue with the sport, at the end of the season, a 50 percent dis-count will be given towards the purchase of junior equipment for the following season upon the return of any equipment bought through the program.

“If anybody has kids they want to get

started in this (skiing or snowboarding), I highly recommend they do this,” Freed-man said. “$100 for skis and some boots is a pretty good deal.”

Available throughout the season, the program is held in conjunction with the Ski Rex Sale. A precursor to the start of the season, the sale helps clear out inventory and introduce riders and skiers to the new technologies and products. From Aug. 29 to Sept. 19, prices are reduced 30 to 70 per-cent storewide, offering low prices on ev-erything from boots and boards to gloves and head gear.

“It helps the industry as a whole,” said Colin Stead, the Arvada store manager. “It really does kick off the season for Colorado, and gets everything started.”

Season passes will also be available dur-ing the sale, as well as the School of Shred program, which provides a free beginner lesson and rental as well as four free days of skiing and riding for fi fth and sixth graders at Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Key-stone and Arapahoe Basin (A-Basin).

For more information, contact Colora-do Ski and Golf at 303-420-0885.

IF YOU GO What: Junior Trade-In programWhere: Colorado Ski and Golf, 7715 Wadsworth

Boulevard, ArvadaWhen: Now - March. 31Cost: $99.98 to $199.99

HAVE A NEWS TIPOur team of professional reporters, photographers and editors areout in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can'tdo it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, eventinformation, letters, commentaries ... Please share by contacting us [emailprotected] and we will take it from there.

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (11)

Arvada Press 11September 4, 2014

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More legal pot needed, state regulators sayHigh prices create opening for black-market salesBy Katie KuntzRocky Mountain PBS I-News

After seven months of recreational mar-ijuana sales in Colorado, the newest goal of state regulators is to increase the amount of marijuana produced and sold by legal retailers.

“Right now we are pretty significantly under what should be produced,” said Ron Kammerzell, deputy senior director of en-forcement for the state Department of Rev-enue.

“What that does is raises the prices, and if the price is too high, then we can’t com-pete with the black market, and that was our ultimate goal with Amendment 64 — we wanted to eliminate the black market,” Kammerzell said.

But new data comparing demand for marijuana in Colorado with legal supply suggests that criminal enterprises could continue to flourish.

A report commissioned by the Mari-juana Enforcement Division earlier this year indicated that Colorado residents and visitors will consume an estimated 130.3 metric tons of marijuana in 2014, but only about 77 metric tons will come from legal medical or recreational outlets.

The rest, about 53.3 metric tons of can-nabis, or nearly 40 percent of the total marijuana demanded, is expected to be produced by unregulated sources. Those sources include “gray market” producers, including home-growers who can legally grow up to six pot plants for personal con-sumption, or black-market producers, in-cluding gangs, that operate outside of the Colorado legal system.

The state’s solution, then, is to increase the amount that is produced legally.

“Basically, the state is trying to ensure that the amount that is being grown in Colorado equals what the demand is,” said Mike Elliot, the executive director of the Marijuana Industry Group, a trade as-sociation representing the interests of the Colorado marijuana industry. “If there is too much, then people want to take it out of state or sell to kids (minors), and if there

is too little, then the black market will fill in the gaps.”

Legal weed runs shortRight now, the state is facing a shortage

of legal marijuana.For state regulators, this creates a prob-

lem, as reducing the black market was not only a priority of Amendment 64, but it is also a federal priority.

U.S. Deputy Attorney General James Cole issued a memorandum a year ago that listed selling to minors, exporting marijuana out of state, and enriching the black market as offenses to be avoided in order to keep the Justice Department on the sidelines in states where pot is legal.

While the state, the federal government and legal marijuana businesses all hope to undercut the black market, their ideas about how to do so vary dramatically.

As the state looks toward altering pro-duction controls, marijuana retailers say supply isn’t the issue. The real problem is price.

“After the cost of producing each pound, I still have to pay a 15 percent excise tax, licensing fees, huge rent because land-lords overcharge marijuana dispensaries, and when I pay federal income tax I can’t deduct like a regular business,” said Brian Ruden, owner of Starbud, Altermeds and Tree of Wellness medical and recreational outlets in Denver, Louisville and Colo-rado Springs. “It ends up that I am selling an eighth (of an ounce) for $60 when the street price is about $25.”

On average, state, local and federal sales taxes on recreational marijuana are just over 21 percent, while the taxes on medi-cal marijuana are about 7.6 percent. Even though the federal government still cat-egorizes marijuana as a dangerous drug, it collects tax revenue on its legal sale in Colorado and Washington.

And the black market benefits from the high taxes, too — as their products can be sold for much less.

“I have had locals come in here without their med cards, and ask what our recre-ational prices are and just turn around and leave,” said Nelson Figueiredo, a “bud-tender” at Medicine Man dispensary in Denver. “They have friends who can sell them pot for much cheaper.”

Tax boosts black marketOne of the demand study’s authors,

research analyst Adam Orens, agreed that the price and tax structure could contrib-ute to the continued black market, but the focus now is to re-evaluate the production management system.

“We don’t have it right yet,” Orens said. “But one thing that came through during the study was that the Marijuana Enforce-ment Division did not want to restrict the market, but was very thoughtful in trying to make sure they have a functioning sys-tem.”

The current production controls are monitored using a plant count, where dif-ferent stores are issued licenses that allow the production of up to 3,600, 6,000 or 10,200 plants, depending on the stores’ li-cense designation.

This differs from the approach taken by the state of Washington, which moni-tors marijuana production by square foot of growing space, but which has much less data available, as retail sale of marijuana has only been legal there for just more than a month.

As the Colorado industry continues to grow, regulators hope to allow steady growth of the legal market.

“We really want to do this in a very pre-dictable and controlled way,” Kammerzell said. “I think what we are seeing is that the biggest driver right now is supply, and that is what we intend to address.”

Kammerzell explained that the Marijua-na Enforcement Division does not control tax structure. Changes there would have to be considered by the Colorado General As-sembly.

“It’s going to be a dynamic work in prog-ress,” Kammerzell said. “Whatever comes from this work group won’t mean our work is done. It will keep changing over time and we will make adjustments.”

The first scheduled work-group meet-ing to discuss a new production control proposal was held in mid-August.

Colorado Community Media brings you this report in partnership with Rocky Mountain PBS I-News. Learn more at rmpbs.org/news. Contact Katie Kuntz at [emailprotected].

INEWS109 - Customers buy marijuana at Medicine Man, a marijuana dispensary and retailer, in Denver on Wednes-day, Aug. 6. Policymakers in Colorado are considering changes to the state’s production limits on legal marijuana to combat the sale of pot in unregulated markets. Photo by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (12)

12 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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Throughout the years, says Box, fans have asked where they could fi nd some of his shorter works, wondering why there wasn’t an anthology.

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Pickett, of course, is one of Box’s best-loved characters – maybe because Joe cherishes his neighbors so much. In “Dull Knife,” one of Wyoming ’s fi nest basketball players is dead. Joe remembers the girl, and he mourns what she could have been. How she died is an even bigger issue.

Joe’s friend, Nate Romanowski also appears in this book and he’s loaded for bear – or, in this case, for a rich Saudi who seems to think he owns the rogue falconer and can buy what he demands. In “The Master Falconer,” fans will be surprised to see that Nate tows the line. Or not.

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— Terri Schlichenmeyer can be reached at [emailprotected].

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (13)

Arvada Press 13September 4, 2014

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Please send cover letter, resume to:[emailprotected] – Please include job title in subject line. INSIDE ADVERTISING SPECIALISTThis position is an inside advertising sales position that is responsible for growing new business revenue. New business includes inactive advertisers and undeveloped business categories. This Inside Sales Specialist will spend 80% of each work week actively selling Colorado Community Media print and digital advertising solutions to local clients. Full Time.

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14 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

LIFEW E S T M E T R O

Take a load o� at new spot downtown

The 16th Street Mall has long been a thorn in the side of Denver dwellers who don’t shop at souvenir stores, don’t care to inhale secondhand smoke and don’t want to sign petitions.

But now the Downtown Denver Busi-ness Improvement District is installing Patio 16, an outdoor dining area in the median of the carless street between California and Stout streets.

Patio 16 opened on Aug. 28 and will offer outdoor seating, enclosed patio railings, a variety of menu options from six local vendors and an outdoor respite for the downtown Denver community to gather, dine and unwind. Patio 16 pro-vides a family-friendly area staffed during hours of operation to ensure a safe, clean and friendly experience, which is open to all residents, employees and visitors.

For more information, visit www.downtowndenver.com/about-the-bid.

`Uncorked’ fall series opensStarted as a monthly event in 2010,

“Fridays Uncorked” has grown into a weekly wine and music series that continues year-around at Bonacquisiti Wine Company at 4640 Pecos St. in the Sunnyside neighborhood.

The fall series opens Sept. 4, and the Sept. 19 “Uncorked” event will feature the band My Old School — A Tribute to the Music of Steely Dan. My Old School is the culmination of the efforts of 12 profes-sional Denver musicians who feel an affinity to Steely Dan and the music that Walter Becker and Donald fa*gen created by applying jazz to pop music.

In addition to the September music lineup, winemaker and namesake Paul Bonacquisiti will be featuring three new wine releases, including a bold spicy Pe-tite Sirah, which last year sold out to wine club members upon release, as well as a Barbera and the [d] Red, a blend of 80 percent Merlot, 10 percent Syrah and 10 percent Zinfandel. The [d] Red is named after Delagua, the coal camp in southern Colorado where Bonacquisti’s father was born. The [d] Red and Barbera releases will be available by the bottle and on tap at the winery in one-liter refillable growl-ers.

Each event runs from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Admission is free and wine is available to purchase, as is food from a food truck that changes each week. Seating is lim-ited, so guests are encouraged to bring a chair. The live music line-up through September includes:• Sept. 4 - Knight Groove • Sept. 12 - Heavy, Timbo and Deb • Sept. 19 - My Old School • Sept. 26 - The Hip Replacements

For more information, visit www.bonacquistiwine.com.

Garlic by the tonThe kitchen at Saucy Noodle Ristoran-

te at 727 S. University Blvd. in the Bonnie Brae neighborhood cooks up more than 1,800 pounds of garlic every year, and it’s been serving it for 50 years this month — that’s well over 75,000 pounds of garlic.

By Crystal [emailprotected]

“Memphis” takes the stage with a little love, laughter and good ol’ fashioned rock ‘n’ roll.

In a time where color defined social norms and carefree pop

music dominated the radio, a song of change and love arose from the underground.

“Memphis,” a musical by Joe DiPietro with music and lyrics by Bon Jovi’s David Bryan, opens the at the Arvada Center, Sept. 9, taking audiences back to the early 1950s in an electrifying world where acceptance and love tri-umph and rock ‘n’ roll, gospel and blues rule the airwaves.

“It’s very strong show,” said Director Rod A. Lansberry. “You’re dealing with so many emotions and mindsets of how things were and how things are. You can’t candy coat that; we all have to face things we don’t really want to face — but you have to recognize that were surrounded by elements like that.”

Transitioning to the early 1950s, “Memphis” takes you through the lives of Huey (Jim Hogan) a young white disc jockey, and Felicia (Aisha Jackson) an aspiring black un-derground nightclub singer. Falling in love with the sound of her voice, the story follows the couple as Huey helps launch Felicia and the energetic, emotional sounds of the R&B into homes across America.

“It’s very powerful and inspiring,” Jackson said. “It tells you an important story with-out banging you over the head with it — it’s smooth.”

Through his radio show, Huey crosses both racial and societal boundaries, bringing what was then referred to as ‘race music’ to a white audience and tackling the hardships of interracial relationships. With struggles of an impending cultural shift, Huey and Felicia work toward their dreams while facing a world of differences where acceptance and love

doesn’t come cheap.“Historically, this creates or enlightens you to what

occurred in civil rights, black versus whites, all those ele-ments — they are definitely still there,” Lansberry said.

Musically driven through songs such as “Under-ground,” “Someday” and “Radio,” “Memphis” pushes racial boundar-ies and pulls at the passions within the audience, inspiring both the characters and the audience to evolve.

“It’s impressive in the storytelling that they have covered every point of view,” Jackson said. “You have the two younger opposite races who kind of grew up knowing that, but we decided to push that boundary — this is what we were given, but that doesn’t mean we have to accept it.”

“This shows it’s OK to bend and not break, and as a society you can bend, you can morph, you can adjust and still stay who you are,” said Kieth Hatten (Delray) “When you tell the truth of that, you can see where we were, but more importantly where we’ve come, and where we

haven’t made it to yet.”

IF YOU GOMemphis runs Sept. 9 through Sept. 28 at the

Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd. For more infor-mation or to purchase tickets, contact 720-898-7200.

Parker continues on Page 15

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Arvada Press 15September 4, 2014

September 6-7, 2014Come live la vita Italiana.

Authentic Italian eats, free admission, live music, children’s grape stomp, free parking and more.

Sat: 10am - 9pm | Sun: 10am - 5pm

303-742-1520 | belmarcolorado.com303-742-1520 | belmarcolorado.com

Erin Markham, the third generation of the Badis family who now operates the restaurant with her husband, Nathan, held a 50th birthday celebration on Aug. 29. The party included menu specials and special prices that evoked the early days of The Noodle: Large one-topping pizzas for $3.95 and spaghetti and meatballs for $4.95.

Markham grew up at the restaurant, which her grandfather Sam bought in 1964 and renamed from Jim Sano’s to “The Saucy Noodle,” with the culinary warning out front on its distinctive red and white canopy awning: “If you don’t like garlic, go home.”

A lot of garlic goes into the Noodle’s spaghetti marinara, which is vegetarian but has so much garlic in it that it looks like ground beef. “The red sauce is grandmother Inez Badis’ recipe,” Markham said. “It’s been a menu staple throughout the decades, alongside the most popular dish, lasagna, as well as spaghetti and the restaurant’s baseball-sized homemade meatballs.”

The menu also features one appetizer that might not catch a younger person’s eye: Morey Amsterdam’s fried ravioli. The dish is named after the late actor and comedian who is best remem-bered as part of the ensemble cast of the classic “The Dick Van Dyke Show” on television.

“It’s called that because in the ’60s he came in and asked if we had such a dish, and we didn’t so he helped himself to the kitchen and made it himself,” Markham said.

New Viewhouse opensThe ‘burbs got their own version of ViewHouse, the LoDo

hot spot with an amazing rooftop patio, when the Centennial restaurant at 7101 S. Clinton St. opened Aug. 28.If you didn’t attend the grand-opening weekend, here’s what you missed: Top-notch Colorado band The Samples kicked off the summer band series, “Music on the Green.”

The Red Bull Motocross Extravaganza featured Red Bull’s professional motocross stunt team drivers and dancing after-ward with DJ Squirt’s hot beats.

More information at www.viewhouse.com or call 303-790-8439.

OverheardEavesdropping on a woman talking on the phone with a

friend: “Nothing exciting going on, well, except for the new guy my daughter is dating right now. He is a model and he is gor-geous. She needs to marry him just so we can look at him across the table at Thanksgiving. Even my husband says, ‘He’s purty.’”

PENNY PARKER’S “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.blacktie-colorado.com/pennyparker. She can be reached at [emailprotected] or at 303-619-5209.

Continued from Page 14

Parker ONGOING ACTIVITIES, ONGOING /BUSINESS GROUPS

MONDAYS

OPEN MIC Living Water Unity Spiritual Community presents open mic night – celebrate your teen self 4:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays at 7401 W. 59th Ave., Arvada. This program gives teens the opportunity to express their performing art including voice and instrument, acting, poetry, stand-up comedy, mime, etc. Open to all students in sixth to 12th grades. Email [emailprotected].

JEFFERSON COUNTY Republican Men’s Club meets 7-9 a.m. Mondays at the Howard Johnson Denver West, 12100 W. 44th Ave., Wheat Ridge. Call Fred Holden at 303-421-7619 for more information. All are welcome, not just Republican men from Je� erson County.

TUESDAYS

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The Lakewood Chapter of Retired and Active Federal Employees meets each second Tuesday at the Episcopal Church, 10th and Garrison. Call Ann Ornelas at 303-517-8558 with questions.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Team Survivor, a health, education and � tness program for women of all abilities who have experienced cancer or are currently in treatment, o� ers weekly free, fun, supportive activities. Tuesdays, 10 a.m., Boulder Creek Walk (meet at Boulder Public Library main entrance). Tuesday, 11-11:30 a.m., Yoga, Boulder Senior Center, 909 Arapahoe Avenue. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Training, Boulder Center for Sports Medicine, 311 Mapleton Avenue (entrance on Maxwell Avenue.). Learn more at rockymtn-teamsurvivor.org.

WEDNESDAYS

AMERICAN LEGION Auxiliary presents Burger Nite, 5-7:30 p.m. every Wednesday at Post 178, 1655 Simms St., Lakewood. Members, their guests and active military invited for varied food and reasonable prices. Visit www.alpost178.org.

ARVADA BIZ Connection www.meetup.com/Arvada-Business-Connection/ is an informal networking event that brings together local entrepreneurs. Meetings are 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays at various restaurants in Olde Town Arvada. A $5 fee is collected from each attendee, which is then donated to a local charity at the end of each quarter. The 4th Quarter Charity is the Dan Peak Foundation who assists families in need. For information, call Micki Carwin at 303-997-9098.

BUFFALO TOASTMASTERS meets 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. the � rst and third Wednesdays at the Je� erson County Government Building, 100 Je� erson County Parkway, Golden. Toastmasters is an international organization that is a fun and supportive environment to learn and practice public speaking and leadership skills. All are welcome. More information is available at www.bu� alotoastmasters.org.

MUSIC TEACHERS Association Suburban Northwest meets 9:30 a.m. to noon the � rst Wednesday of the month at Community in Christ Church, 12229 W. 80th Ave., Arvada. Meetings are open to the public and include refresh-

ments, business meeting and program featuring music teaching professionals from around the state lecturing on the latest teaching developments.

WOMEN NETWORKING Women’s Business Group Wednesday morning networking

GROUP in Arvada has openings for women who can commit to a weekly morning meeting. Limited to one business per category. Call for available openings, 303-438-6783, or go online to [emailprotected].

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN NW Metro Business and Professional Women meets the � rst Wednesday of each month from September to May. Our mis-sion is to achieve equity for all women in the workplace through advocacy, education and information. Call Marcia at 303-827-3283 to RSVP.

THURSDAYS

BUSINESS SPIRITUALITY Business Honoring Spirituality meets 7-9 a.m. every Thursday at the Community Center of Mile Hi Church, 9079 W. Alameda Ave., Lakewood. Meetings include networking, a brief meditation by a licensed practitioner, guest speaker and breakfast. For additional information, visit www.bhsmilehi.org or call Patty Whitelock at 303-274-0933.

COMMUNITY COFFEE Join Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp on the fourth Thursday of each month to talk about issues that are important to you. Community Co� ee will be from 7-8 a.m. at La Dolce Vita, Ice Cream Room, 5756 Olde Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada; and from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Panera Bread, 10450 Town Center Drive, Westminster.

INVESTORS’ MEETINGS The Rocky Mountain Inventors Association meets 6:30-8:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday of every month (excluding November and December) at Vesta Technology, 13050 W. 43rd Drive, Suite 300, Golden. Pre-sentations in marketing, manufacturing, engineering, � nance, business and legal, followed by networking. Go online to www.rminventor.org for details.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Team Survivor, a health, education and � tness program for women of all abilities who have experienced cancer or are currently in treatment, o� ers weekly free, fun, supportive activities. Tuesdays, 10 a.m., Boulder Creek Walk (meet at Boulder Public Library main entrance). Tuesday, 11-11:30 a.m., Yoga, Boulder Senior Center, 909 Arapahoe Avenue. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Training, Boulder Center for Sports Medicine, 311 Mapleton Avenue (entrance on Maxwell Avenue.). Learn more at rockymtn-teamsurvivor.org.

FRIDAYS

CALMUP JOURNEY Prefer to help yourself rather than do the coaching or psychotherapy thing? Let me share free information about the CalmUp Journey, a one-page self-examination worksheet for men and women. Join me for co� ee or tea 8-9 a.m. most Fridays at Whole Foods Market Belmar, 444 S. Wadsworth Blvd. in Lakewood. Let me know you’re planning to be there so we’re sure to connect. Contact www.DrLorieGose.com or 303-500-2340.

GOLDEN GATE Community Grange, 25201 Golden Gate Canyon Road, has meetings at 7 p.m. the second Friday of the month. Activities include yoga, dances, eggmania, special wildlife programs, holiday craft fair. Grange hall

AREA CLUBS

Clubs continues on Page 16

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16 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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available for rental for weddings, par-ties, reunions, etc. Call Rich Phillips at 303-277-1933 or go to www.goldengat-egrange.com. New members welcome.

SATURDAYS

COLORADO CITIZENS for Peace meets 10:30-11:30 a.m. every Saturday at the intersections of West 52nd and Wadsworth Boulevard to try to bring an end to the wars. Signs will be furnished

for those who do not have them. Contact Cindy Lowry at 303-431-1228 or [emailprotected].

MEDITATION CLASSES Various styles of meditation will be explored from 9:30-10:30 a.m. each Saturday at PranaTonic, 807 14th St., Golden. We’ll begin with a short introduction to meditation and what to expect followed by a meditation period of 30-40 minutes and time at the end for group discussion. Call 303-274-5733. Visit www.PranaTonic.com.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Shipwrights is a wood ship modeling club that meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Saturday of each month at Rockler’s Woodworking and Hardware Store, 2553 S. Colorado Blvd. in Denver. The club also has a workshop at the Arvada City Hall, 8101 Ralston Road. We meet here at 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the �rst Saturday of each month. Go to www.rockymountainshipwrights.org for information.

SUNDAYS

FREE WALTZ/POLKA lessons Polka Lover Klubs, Denver Kickers, 16776 W. 50th Ave. in Golden, meets from 3-7 p.m. Sundays. Live music. Beautiful dance �oor. Admission $4 members, $6 nonmembers. Annual membership $15. Contact Leo at 720-232-0953 or [emailprotected].

ONGOING/ EDUCATIONDISCUSSION GROUPS Covenant Village hosts Wednesdays at 2 p.m. This series of monthly events features expert speakers on a wide variety of educational and entertaining topics. Please plan to attend one, several or all of our programs, held at 9153 Yarrow St. in Westminster. Admission is free, but seating is limited. Call 303-403-2205 for driving directions and to reserve your place. Come early for refreshments; fellowship lectures begin at 2 p.m. To learn more about the residency options and lifestyle at Covenant Village of Colorado, call us at 303-424-4828.

ESL CLASSES — Covenant Presbyte-rian Church, 6100 W. 44th St. in Wheat Ridge, is sponsoring a free series of English as a Second Language classes for adults 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday nights. These classes will emphasize a conversational method of instruction. Beginner through advanced classes are o�ered. You may register on any Thursday night. For direc-tions or more information, call the church at 410-442-5800 or go to our website at www.cpcwheatridge.org.

ONGOING /FINE Arts and Entertainment

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN Church Choir meets at 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The choir assists in Concordia’s traditional worship service three out of four Sundays per month. The church is at 13371 W. Alam-eda Parkway in Lakewood (the church nestled close to Green Mountain). If you have a desire to sing and are interested in joining, please contact Joan at [emailprotected] or 303-989-5260.

DANCE CLUB — Blue Nova Dance Club meets 2:30-4:30 p.m. on the �rst and third Sundays every month at the Wheat Ridge Grange, 3850 High Court in Wheat Ridge. For more information or dance lessons, contact Dave at 303-578-6588 or email [emailprotected].

MUSIC PERFORMANCES Patrice LeBlanc performs on keyboard and vocals 6-9

P.M. EVERY Friday and Saturday at Purple Ginger Asian Fusion Restaurant, 2610 Young�eld St. Call 303-237-1133 for more information.

SINGERS NEEDED The Troubadours Choir is looking for a director and new

members. This is a volunteer choir, com-prised mostly of seniors. The Troubadours meet at 9 a.m. every Friday at Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 45th and Wadsworth. For more information, call Gary at 303-477-1380.

SYMPHONY AUDITIONS The Lake-wood Symphony is holding auditions for concertmaster (includes an honorarium), principal viola (includes an honorarium) and all section strings. Also, we are auditioning for subs in other sections. Rehearsals are 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays, September through May, at Green Moun-tain United Methodist Church; concerts are at the Lakewood Cultural Center. Call 303-980-0400 for requirements, appoint-ment and further information.

WEEKLY MUSIC Jazz @ the Creek is every �rst Wednesday of the month at Living Water Unity, 59th and Vance in Olde Town Arvada. Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Come listen to an hour of great jazz. For more information, call 720-935-4000 or email [emailprotected].

ONGOING / HEALTHCAREBOOT CAMP Get out of the gym and get results. Front Range Boot Camp provides dynamic, unique and results-driven full-body workouts exclusively for women. All ages, sizes and �tness levels will succeed. Revamp your �tness routine by getting out of your routine. Indoor location is just behind Super Target at Kipling Street and 50th Avenue. Outdoor location is Skyline Park by Stenger soccer �elds. Email [emailprotected] or go online to www.FrontRangeBootCamp.com.

HEALTH GROUP A women’s health group with the motto “Your health, your life: Take charge” meets noon-1 p.m. Fridays at 9797 W. Colfax Ave, No. 3AA, in Lakewood. Learn about natural alterna-tives to health concerns. No charge to be part of this group. For more information, call Linda at 303-883-5473 or email [emailprotected].

HOME CARE Always Best Care Denver West provides in-home care, skilled nursing and free senior community place-ment. Always Best Care provides every individual and family with well-trained personal care attendants and expert nursing support. We help families make informed decisions about senior care, and guide them through comprehensive solutions designed speci�cally for their unique situations. To learn more, go online to www.AlwaysBestCare.com/DenverWest or call 303-952-3060.

TAI CHI is now taught at Lakeview Wellness and Event Center 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 2-3:30 p.m. Fridays. Call 303-989-6300 or 303-730-0986 for cost information and reservations.

WEIGHT LOSS — The EZ Weight-Loss Challenge 12-week program meets10-11 a.m. Tuesdays at Arvada Church of God, 7135 W. 68th Ave. Free coaching, me-tabolism test and nutrition information. Cash prizes awarded to the top three big-gest achievers. For information on cost or to preregister, call Chris at 720-320-2394.

YOGA FOR Survivors Whether you’re a longtime cancer survivor, in treatment or a caregiver to a cancer survivor, Yoga for

Cancer Survivors & Caregivers is a great

WAY TO live more comfortably in your own body. Bene�ts include decreased stress and pain, improved sleep and en-ergy, improved lymphatic �ow, reduced nausea and a greater sense of well-being. Class led by Shari Turney, a registered yoga instructor with specialized training through Yoga for Survivors. Class o�ered 1:30-2:45 p.m. Sundays at Duncan Family YMCA, 6350 Eldridge St., Arvada. Contact Shari Turney at 720-319-3703 or [emailprotected] before taking your �rst class to ensure a safe practice.

ONGOING / RECREATION, CLUBS AND SERVICESAA MEETINGS There are more than 1,000 AA meetings in the Denver metro area every week. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol, come see us. Call 303-322-4440 for a meeting in your area, or visit the website at www.daccaa.org.

BUFFALO TOASTMASTERS meets from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. the �rst and third Wednesdays at the Federal Highway Administration building, 12300 W. Dakota Ave., Lakewood. Toastmasters is an international organization that is a fun and supportive environment to learn and practice public speaking skills. All are welcome. More information is available at www.bu�alotoastmasters.org.

CANSURVIVE IS a support group for those who have experienced or are receiving cancer treatment. The meet-ing format is simple with an opening invocation followed by brief member introductions along with a check-in to see how attendees are doing. The discussion topic centers around healing and healing modalities, and may include a guest speaker or a guided-healing visualization. The free support group meets from 10 a.m. to noon on the fourth Saturday of every month at Mile High Church, 9079 West Alameda Ave., Lakewood. For more information or support do not hesitate to contact Lawrence Connors RScP at 303-910-3473 or [emailprotected].

COLUMBINE #96 Rainbow Girls meets at 7 p.m. the �rst and third Thursday of each month at the Golden Lodge, 400 Tenth St. in Golden. Youth activities for girls ages 10-19. Contact Eve at [emailprotected] or 303-424-0134.

DOG TRAINER program Misha May Foundation Dog Training and Rescue is o�ering a “Become a Dog Trainer” program in Arvada and Denver. The licensed nonpro�t organization rescues, rehabilitates and re-homes dogs at risk, regardless of breed or mix, behavior or medical issue, or amount of time needed. The dog trainer program includes puppy, basic obedience and behavior solutions. Email [emailprotected] or call 303-239-0382 for an application or more information.

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The Lakewood Chapter of Retired and Active Federal Employees meets at 1 p.m. every second Tuesday at the Episcopal Church, 10th and Garrison. Call Ann Ornelas, 303-517-8558.

FIGHTING FRAUD The District At-torney’s O�ce o�ers free Power Against

Fraud seminars for groups of all sizes and people of all ages. Don’t become a victim of identity theft or other consumer fraud. Contact Cary Johnson, 303-271-6980, for more information.

FLATIRONS VIEW Toastmasters meets at 6:30 p.m. the �rst and third Wednesday of every month at The Depot at Five Parks, 13810 W. 85th Ave. in Arvada. Polish your speaking and presentation skills in a fun, instructional, nurturing environment. For more information visit http://9407.toastmastersclubs.org/.

FOOD PANTRY God’s Table Food Pantry is open 9-11 a.m. every third Saturday of each month, and 10 a.m.-noon every fourth Thursday each month for Je�erson County residents who meet certain federal guidelines. God’s Table and Food Pantry is located at 6400 W. 26th Ave. in Edgewater, behind the Vietnamese Cen-tral Baptist Church. For more information, call Beverly at 303-525-7685.

FOOD PANTRY Agape Life Church (ALC) distributes Je�erson County commodity foods from 10-11 a.m. Thursdays, at ALC, 5970 W. 60th Ave. in Arvada. ALC provides this service to all Je�erson County residents. If you have questions, call 303-431-6481.

GEM/MINERAL CLUB The North Je�co Gem and Mineral Club meets at 7:30 p.m. the second Friday of each month at the Apex Community Recreation Center, 6842 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. The meetings are open to the public.

GIRL SCOUTS Snowboard. Scuba dive. Sleep over in a museum or at the zoo. Go backstage at a concert or a Broadway play. Even stage your own Project Runway. Girl Scouts turns normal days into days you’ll remember all your life. Girl Scouts o�ers girls of all ages and backgrounds a safe place to explore the world and discover their potential. There are now more �exible ways to be a Girl Scout than joining a troop. To explore your options, visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org, email [emailprotected] or call 1-877-404-5708.

HOLISTIC GATHERINGS The Resonance Center, 6650 W. 44th Ave. in Wheat Ridge, o�ers Holistic Happy Hours 4-7 p.m. on the second Thursday every month with light snacks and tea for everyone. We invite the community to join this social and wellness event that o�ers acupuncture, massage, re�exology, psychotherapy and coaching, and energy work.

JEFFCO SPELLBINDERS meets the third Monday of each month at Wheat Ridge United Methodist Church, 38th and Wadsworth in Wheat Ridge. The Spellbinders is dedicated to restoring the art of oral storytelling to connect elders to youth, weaving together the wisdom of diverse cultures throughout time. Grade-school children in Je�erson County bene�t from the volunteer who visits their classroom monthly. Requests from schools are greater than we can currently �ll. Training and placement available, contact [emailprotected] to become involved. The kids need you.

JEFFCO SERTOMA Club meets the �rst and third Thursdays at Cafe del Sol, 608

Continued from Page 15

AREA CLUBS

JEFFCO BOARD OF EDUCATION ON THE RECORDThe Jefferson County Board of

Education discussed the following legislation during its Aug. 28 regular business meeting. Board members in attendance were President Ken Witt, First Vice President Julie Wil-liams, Second Vice President Lesley Dahlkemper, Secretary John Newkirk and Treasurer Jill Fellman.

Fact FindingThe board of education voted

3-2, (Witt, Williams, Newkirk) to reject the fact finding agreement in negotiations with the teachers union, Jefferson County Educators Associa-tion (JCEA).

Board president Witt proposed a new pay scale which would raise full-time teacher’s base pay to $38,000, and giving a bonus or compensation increase to teachers rated as effec-tive or highly effective in their most recent evaluation.

With this move, the Chief Finan-

cial Officer, Lorie Gillis, and the hu-man resources department will now recalculate the financial specifics to reflect how this scale would affect the district’s 5,000 educators. According to Gillis, this process is extensive and will take several weeks to calculate before presenting the data to the board. Any changes made would not go into effect until early October at the earliest.

State Education FundingThe board unanimously voted to

accept a resolution regarding state education funding.

The resolution asks the Colorado legislature to a sensible and constitu-tional school finance system, seeking any new funds be given to boards to help reduce the negative factor.

PARCC TestingThe board voted 3-2 (Dahlkemper,

Fellman, Witt) to table a resolution

seeking the delay of implementation of Partnership for Academic Readi-ness for College and Careers testing and implementation of Common Core.

The board heard a presentation from Michael Brickman, a national policy director with the Fordham Institute, Sandra Stotsky, member of the Common Core Validation Committee and Chris Watney with the Colorado Children’s Campaign, regarding the Colorado Academic Standards, Common Core standards and it’s affect on students.

The discussion centered around standards, curriculum and assess-ments and whether or not Common Core and PARCC testing was appro-priate for the district.

The next board of education meet-ing will be 6:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 4, in the Jefferson County Educa-tion Center, 1829 Denver West Dr., Golden.

— Compiled by Crystal Anderson

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Arvada Press 17September 4, 2014

YOUR WEEK MORE EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Thursday for publi-cation the following week. Send listings to [emailprotected]. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

MUSIC/CONCERTSCHAUTAUQUA SUMMER CONCERTS

COLORADO CHAUTAUQUA in Boulder wraps up its 2014 summer concert season on Saturday, Sept. 13, with Steven Wright. Show begins at 8 p.m. Tickets and information are available at tickets.chautauqua.com, or at the Chautauqua box o� ce.

TIBETAN SINGING BOWL CONCERT

A 40-MINUTE healing/concert using Tibetan Singing Bowls is 6:30-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at Asana Studio, 5701 Yukon St., Arvada. Tibetan masters have used singing bowl therapy to heal for centuries. Bring a backjack or yoga mat to lie on during the session. Limited supply of yoga mats available at studio. Before the concert, a Vinyasa yoga class is o� ered 5-6 p.m. Go to www.asanastudio.com/workshops.html for information on cost, or call 303-431-6311.

THEATER/PERFORMANCESPHAMALY’S ‘RAPUNZEL’ AUDITIONS

PHAMALY THEATRE Company will have auditions for its touring musical production of “Rapunzel.” Preliminary auditions will be 6-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5, and are by appoint-ment only (call 303-365-0005 or go to www.phamaly.org). Callback auditions will be Saturday, Sept. 6. Both auditions will be at the Newman Center for Theatre Education, 1101 13th St., Denver. All roles are available. The show opens Nov. 14-16, and then will tour through May 2015. Those auditioning must have one or more disabilities as de� ned by the Americans with Disabilities Act.

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS CLASSIC ON STAGE

“A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE” by Tennessee Williams will play through Sept. 7 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Directed by Craig Bond. Haley Johnson, Kurt Brighton and Patrick Collins reprise their 2008 roles. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets available at 303-856-7830, vintagetheatre.com.

WITTY THEATER SHOW

MINERS ALLY PLAYHOUSE presents “Dylan Went Electric” from Friday, Sept. 12, to Sunday, Oct. 19, at 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Witty and eccentric characters explore the truth of their life and times in this production. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m. Sundays, and 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 19. For tickets and more information, go to www.minersalley.com or call 303-935-3044.

ARTREPURPOSED HABITAT EXHIBIT

LOCAL ARTIST VALERIE SAVARIE and California based artist Sharon Eisley found each other through Eric Kent Wines, a winery in Santa Rosa, Calif., that supports artists by purchasing art, which is then reproduced onto their labels. Although their styles are di� erent, Savarie and Eisley each use repurposed materials and im- ages to create their work. Their work can be seen in Repurposed Habitat, which runs through Sunday, Sept. 21, at Valkarie Gallery, 445 S. Saulsbury St., Lakewood. Contact Valerie Savarie at 720-220-7587 or hello@valkarie� neart.com, or go to www.valkarie� neart.com

EVENTSHARVEST FESTIVAL KIDS PARADE

THE ARVADA HARVEST FESTIVAL Kids Parade is Saturday, Sept. 6, at the McIlvoy Park Pavilion at Ralston Road and Upham Street. This year’s theme is Pioneers of the American West.” Register your kids for their own parade. Entry is free and everyone ages 12 and younger are eligible to participate. The parade begins at 3:30 p.m. Categories include Pioneer West Character, Decorated Pets, or Decorated Wheels. Go to www.arvadaharvestfestivalparade.com, or call Nancy Bentzen at 303-421-5305.

MOVIE NIGHT TO EMPOWER WOMEN

THE FIRST part of “Half the Sky” will be showing on Saturday, Sept. 6, at Living Light of Peace, 5927 Miller St. Arvada, starting at 5:30 pm. The second part will show Oct. 4th. This � lm is based on the book“Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, whose movement is to turn oppression into opportunity for women worldwide. Movie is free but donations excepted, snacks provided, all are welcome.

FESTIVAL ITALIANO AT BELMAR

A TWO-DAY celebration of Italian culture, food, wine and artisans is Saturday, Sept. 6, and Sunday, Sept. 7, at the Belmar Shopping District in Lakewood. A portion of event food sales bene� t Project Angel Heart. Festival hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 6, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 7. Go to www.belmarcolorado.com/sub/event/festival_italiano/

REPUBLICAN MEN’S CLUB

JEFFERSON COUNTY Republican Men’s Club meets 7-9 a.m. Mondays at Howard

Johnson Denver West, JohnPH Restaurant, 12100 W. 44th Ave. Students, young people, new people and women are invited and welcome to join. The next meeting, on Monday, Sept. 8, will feature Jimmy Sengenberger, president and CEO of Liberty Day Institute. His presentation will be “Getting’ Ready for a Rockin’ and Rollin’ Constitution Day Celebration, Wednesday, September 17, 2014: So, What Can You Do About It? Will You?” The Monday, Sept. 15, meeting will feature Barry Farah, businessman, entrepreneur and speaker, presenting “The Missing Fire-in-the-Belly.” Contact Fred Holden, president, at 303-421-7619.

WOMEN’S CONNECTION LUNCHEON

DENVER WEST Women’s Connection plans its monthly luncheon on Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Concordia Lutheran Church, 13371 W. Alameda Parkway, Lakewood. The luncheon topic is Playing a Good Game. Call 303-985-2458 for reservations.

ROLLER DERBY BOUT

LAKEWOOD’S SOUTH Side Derby Dames take on the Naughty Pines Derby Dames of Laramie, Wyo., at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at Rocky Mountain Roller Hockey, 3606 S. Independence St., Lakewood. Buy tickets at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/843660. After the bout, join the team for an after-party at West Hill Grill, 11614 W. Belleview Ave., Littleton. Call 303-933-1680, go to www.southsidederbydames.org or go to https://www.facebook.com/events/806186886079681.

WESTMINSTER CLASS OF 1974 40TH REUNION

THE WESTMINSTER High School Class of 1974 will have its 40th reunion Saturday, Sept. 13 (Hyland Hills) and a picnic on Sunday, Sept. 14 (Westminster Elks). Go to [emailprotected] to register; at-the-door tickets will be limited. Go to the Westminster Class of 1974 page on Facebook for details. Email Sharon Starr, [emailprotected].

HEALTH/WELLNESSWRITING THROUGH YOUR GRIEF

LEARN TO use various journaling techniques to help access memories, deep feelings and inner wisdom to process grief from a loss to death at Writing Through Your Grief, 5:30-8 p.m. Tuesdays from Sept. 9-30 at Collier Hospice Center, 3210 Lutheran Parkway, Wheat Ridge. Workshop will use gentle exercises from the work of John Fox, poetry therapist, to explore poem making. Class time will include personal writing time, as well as an opportunity to share writing with the group in a supportive atmosphere. Jaynie Muggli, MA, LPC, is a bereavement counselor and group leader at Collier Hospice Center at Lutheran Medical Center. Contact Muggli at 303-403-7187 and [emailprotected]. To register, call 303-689-4545.

FROM COLUMBINE TO ROBIN WILLIAMS [PHOTO AAUW 9.11 JRITTER]

FORMER COLORADO First Lady Jeannie Ritter, who is a mental health ambassador for the Mental Health Center of Denver, will discuss how mental health issues can impact a community at the Lakewood Branch of AAUW’s next meeting, at 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at Holy Shepherd Lutheran Church, at 9th and Kipling, Lakewood. Guests are welcome. Go to http://lakewood-co.aauw.net/

EDUCATIONSALES TAX WORKSHOPS

THE COLORADO Department of Revenue o� ers workshops on sales tax law fundamentals. The workshops are open to the public and o� er information on com-mon sales tax topics to help businesses remain in compliance with Colorado tax law. Registration is required. Go to www.TaxSeminars.state.co.us (click on Live Workshops, then Main Class Schedule). Register under the Student tab, then sign up. The next classes are from 9 a.m. to noon Friday, Sept. 5; and Friday, Sept. 26, in Lakewood. CPE credits and training materials are available.

GET SPLASHED IN COLOR

ARVADA WEST BOOSTER CLUB plans the Cats Color Crawl at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at Arvada West High School, 11595 Allendale Drive. This is a color run, and runners will get doused in colored chalk. Go to https://360.webconnex.com/AWHS to sign up. Registration cost is $25 before Sept. 6; $30 from Sept. 7-19, and $35 on race day.

MONDAY NIGHT TALKS

TRAINING WITH GRACE presents Monday Night Talks from 7-8 p.m. at 9100 W. 6th Ave., Lakewood. Topics include “What are you Chewing On?” (choose appropriate toys and treats for voracious chewers) on Monday, Sept. 8; “Mine” (resource guard-ing) on Monday, Sept. 15; “Play with your Dog!” (what is good play interaction) on Monday, Sept. 22; “Greetings” (introducing your dog to another) on Monday, Sept. 29. Contact www.TrainingWithGrace.com, email [emailprotected] or call 303-238-3647.

FOSTER CARE AND ADOPTION INFORMATION

THE COLLABORATIVE FOSTER CARE Program of Arapahoe, Douglas and Je� er-son counties is looking for foster families and those willing to adopt. A free informa-tion session is planned from 6-7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8, at Applewood Community Church, 12930 W. 32nd Ave., Golden. Register at www.collaborativefostercare.com.

ROLE OF MALAYSIA IN WORLD

ACTIVE MINDS will explore the history of Malaysia, its role in the region and world, and the recent events involving Malaysia Airlines � ights. Program is from 11 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Sept. 9, at First Presbyterian Church of Lakewood, 8210 W. 10th Ave. Malaysia has grown in importance in the region, with one of the strongest economies in Asia over the last 50 years. It is home to an ethnically diverse population of about 30 million. Program is free, and no RSVP is needed.

WOMEN AND MONEY: A BEGINNER’S CLASS

WOMEN HAVE di� erent priorities and learning styles than men. Women tend to live longer, choose safety over risk, are caregivers, stay home with kids, and plan for the future. This class covers the � nancial planning process from start to � nish, includ-ing setting � nancial goals, creating a budget, determining risk tolerance, Roth and Traditional IRAs, spousal Social Security bene� ts, taxes and in� ation and more. A fun, easy to understand class led by investment adviser Jo-Ann Holst will be 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the Golden Community Center, 1470 10th St., Golden. RSVP by calling 720-287-5880.For information, go to www.fuel� nancial.com.

CLEAN COMEDY SHOW

COMEDY NIGHT at West Woods presents John Crist, with special guests Heath Arthur and Greg DiMuro. The Clean Comedy Show is at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 10, at West Woods Bar & Grill, 6655 Quaker St., Arvada. For tickets and more information, go to www.eventbrite.com/e/comedy-night-west-woods-sept-2014-tickets-12704159483

WILDERNESS TREKKING SCHOOL

LEARN ABOUT hiking in the Colorado mountains, including trails, maps, nutrition, gear, weather, emergencies, snow hiking and more, at a series of lectures by Colorado Mountain Club. Wilderness Trekking School is o� ered on Tuesdays, Saturdays or Sundays from Tuesday, Sept. 9 to Sunday, Oct. 26, and those who attend will learn how to travel safely and con� dently in the back-country. Meet at American Mountaineering Center, 710 10th St., Golden. For information and to sign up, go to www.hikingdenver.net/schools/wts. For more about the Colorado Mountain Club, go to http://cmc.org or call 303-279-3080.

AVOID CHARITY SCAMS

HOW TO avoid being fooled by fake charities will be discussed at noon and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Lifetree Café, 5675 Field St., Arvada. “How to Sni� Out a Scam: Practical Tips for Giving Wisely” features a recorded interview with a woman who rallied her community to raise money for a friend who lied about needing cash for cancer treatment. Lifetree participants will get tools that will help them tell which charitable appeals are legitimate and feel comfortable giving to worthy causes. Contact Polly Wegner at 303-424-4454 or [emailprotected].

GOLDEN THEATER SHOW

“SUDDENLY LAST Summer,” by Tennessee Williams, will play Thursday, Sept. 11, to Saturday, Sept. 13, at Golden High School, 701 24th St., Golden. Directed by Kelly Hasbrouck. Performances: 7 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Saturday. Tickets available at www.goldenhighschool.com or at the door.

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS

THOMAS THE Tank Engine will visit the Colorado Railroad Museum in September. Day Out With Thomas events are Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 13-14, Sept. 20-21, and Sept. 27-28 at 17155 W. 44th Ave., Golden. For the � rst time, Thomas will talk to his fans. Call the museum at 303-279-4591 or go to www.coloradorailroadmuseum.org to purchase tickets.

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18 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

CROSSROADSCHURCH OF DENVER A PLACE TO DO LIFE

SERVICE TIMESSunday: 9 aM and 10:30 aM

WedneSday: 6:30 PMCHILDREN’S MINISTRY FOR ALL AGES

9725 W. 50th • Wheat Ridge, CO 80033(303) 421-3800 Main

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Arvada Christian Church

8010 West 62nd Avenue 303-422-5412

Sunday Worship ..............9:30 amWed. Prayer/Bible Study ..6:30 pm(Free Meals every 3rd Wed)

Nursery Available

Jefferson Unitarian Church

14350 W. 32nd Ave.303-279-5282

www.jeffersonunitarian.orgA Religious Home for the Liberal Spirit

Service Times: 9:15am / 11:00amReligious education for all ages.

Nursery care provided.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

AP

George Morrison, Senior PastorPlease join us for our weekend & mid-week services

62nd & Ward RoadFamily Worship Center

Saturday ........................................ 5:00 pmSunday .......................9:00 am & 10:45 amWednesday ................................... 6:30 pm

4890 Carr StreetSunday ........................................ 10:30 am

UNITED METHODIST

Nursery Available

6750 Carr St. Arvada, CO 80004303.421.5135 • www.arvadaumc.org

S ERVICES8 &10 amChurch School9 &10 am

PRESBYTERIAN

Worship: 10:00am every SundaySunday School: 9:00am Sept – May

(nursery provided)5592 Independence St. 80002

Tel. 303-422-3463www.Arvadapc.com

Now enrolling forAll Precious Children Learning Center

Living and Sharing the Love of Christ

CATHOLIC

Proclaiming Christto the Mountains & Plains

www.SaintJoanCatholic.org12735 W 58th Ave · 80002 · 303-420-1232

Daily Masses: 8:30am, Mon-Sat

Confessions: 8am Mon; Wed – Fri 7:30am & 4:00pm Sat

Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:00 PM

Sunday Masses: 7:30, 9:00, 11:30 am, 5:30pm

ST. JOAN OF ARC C AT H O L I C C H U RC H

To advertise your place of worshipCall 303-566-4100

MarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceAdvertise: 303-566-4100

MarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplaceMarketplace

SUMMER’S ALMOST OVER!BUT THERE’S STILL TIME TO HAVE YOUR GARAGE SALE!

303-566-40918 lines in18 papers303-566-4091

$45

Instruction

MUSIC LESSONS: piano, voice,woodwinds, she teaches

1/2 lessons for $25 beginning at3pm until last lesson at 7pm

Monday, Tuesday & ThursdayGOLDEN

303-726-7644MASTERS in MUSIC ED

Piano Lessons givenin Thornton & Northglenn

All ages $15 per 1/2 hour lesson27 years experience (303)280-0731

Lost and Found

If you have been inLongmont Vacuum

in Longmont, Co. this last Mondaymorning, Aug. 18th could you

please contact us at 303-776-8310.We would like to visit with you.

Misc. Notices

Want To Purchaseminerals and other oil/gasinterests. Send details to:P.O. Box 13557Denver, CO 80201

FARM & AGRICULTURE

Farm Products & Produce

Grain Finished Buffaloquartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

Garage Sales

55O WOLFENSBERGER CASTLEROCK Sept 12th & 13th 9-4 at Epi-phany Luthern church. Annual salesupports our Orphan Grain Trainmission project. We have a reputa-tion for offering good clean mer-chandise. Estimated 15,000 itemsfor sale, Kids costumes, babythings, guy stuff, one of a kind newquilts, a lot of gently used furniture,purses and clothing accessories,holiday , household, unusual andunique items and a few things wecan't identify but you most likelyhave always wanted one. Someitems are priced, we will acceptyour reasonable offer for the rest.Weather no problem, most thingsare indoors.

ArvadaBig Garage SaleFriday & Saturday

September 5th & 6th8am-2pm

7734 Newland StreetArvada 80003

Office Chair, Craft Stuff, HouseholdItems, Books - paperbacks, Music

CD's, Clothing and much more!

Golden/GeneseeHuge Multi-Family/Moving Sale

2338 Bitterroot LaneGolden

Friday, Saturday, SundaySeptember 5, 6, 7

9am-5pm Furniture & Household Items

See Craigslist for PicturesCash Only

Garage Sales

Saturday, Sept. 13thfrom 8am to 3pm

Croke Dr., Lane St.,Orangewood Dr. &

Appletree Place from 97th to 99th streets

AnnualGarage Sale

Hillcrest HOA Community

in �ornton

Highlands RanchHuge Community Garage Sale

15 + HomesFriday & Saturday

September 5 & 6 8am-1pmThe Villages in Highlands RanchHighlands Ranch Parkway and

Westridge Knolls(Near Lucent)

IT’S THE BIG ONE MARTHA!Annual Yard Sale benefits Boy

Scout Troop 342One acre of great stuff!

Home & office furniture, tools, toys,books, electronics, sporting goods,clothes, housewares, antiques and

much more!PRICED TO SELL!

143 Union, LakewoodSaturday Sept 13th 8-4pm

MERCHANDISE

Antiques & Collectibles

Antique, Cast Iron Well hand-pump$150 negotiable (303)979-9534

Appliances

GE Apartment size washer/dryeruses 110, Used only 1 year

Paid $2000 asking $1400 obo (303)396-2000

Clothing

Ladies ClothesEvening Gowns,better dresses, casual clothesSizes 4, 6 & 8 all classic, not trendy,worn once or never worn, cashonly, Littleton 303-332-3235

Furniture

48" Diameter solid oak table, 4chairs, 2 leaves, very goodcondition $275 cash only

(303)432-2379or (303)521-9878

Miscellaneous

Coffee/End Tables, Bar stools,lamps, ski boots, ladies bike, TVStands, Ethan Allen Furniture,

Thomasville Bedroom set(303)947-5850

Miscellaneous

FAST TREESGrow 8-12 feet yearly.

$17-$23 delivered.Potted. Brochure online:www.fasttrees.comor 509 447 4181

PETS

TRANSPORTATION

Autos for Sale

Buing UnwantedCars and Trucks?

(303)594-4331

2007 Mitsubishi Eclipse SpyderConvertible, Burnt Orange.

Beautiful and fun to drive. 6-speedmanual transmission. 95,000 miles.

$9,500 OBO 720-587-7469

RV’s and Campers

2006 Jayco Eagle 30' 5th wheelRV Trailer w/a slide out,

excellent condition $16,500303-840-1231

Divorce Must Sell: Beautiful Cus-tom '03 Beaver' Contessa Class Amotorcoach, 55k miles. Reduced$12,000. to $67,900. Decorator in-terior, real Cherry Cabinetry, Italiantile, full paint loaded with new up-grades, 370 hp Cummins Diesel.NO DEALERS 303-875-4209

Wanted

Cash for all Carsand Trucks

Under $1000Running or not.Any condition

(303)741-0762bestcashforcars.com

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK,BOAT, RV; Running or not, towww.developmentaldisabled.orgTax deductible! 303-659-8086.

14 years of service

Preparing kids for change in fall Children behave best when they know

what to expect and have practiced what to say. Children feel more comfortable in social situations, including the fi rst days of school, if they have practiced the words needed to express their feelings and needs.

Visit the school, their room and play-ground together. Where will coats, lunch and book bags be placed? Where is the bathroom?

Discussing and role-playing some of the tips below can be fun for the whole family, as long as everything is kept light. The goal is to help, not create more anxi-ety.

Have a planExperts suggest young children need

10 to 12 hours of sleep each night. Plan a healthy breakfast together and send a nu-tritious snack for midmorning. If children aren’t hungry when they fi rst wake up, give them some water or milk and a bag of nutritious cereal, toast and cheese to munch. This helps reduce a midmorning, grouchy sugar low.

How much time is needed to dress be-fore breakfast and travel to school? Begin adjusting bedtimes to approximate the new schedule. Have several trial runs and then add 10 minutes.

Choose and set out clothes, backpack with notes and assignments, shoes and weather-appropriate outerwear the night before to avoid morning rush and family stress.

Practice saying something nice to send family members on their way each morn-ing. Attitude is important. Say “Hi” with a smile to the bus or carpool driver and others.

At school,hang up clothing and follow other school and classroom procedures. Walk and use an “indoor” school voice and open doors for adults and others. When adults use a signal to get atten-tion, be quiet immediately and ready for instructions.

Practice courtesyUse the words ”please,” “thank you,”

and “excuse me.” Close the bathroom door, fl ush the toilet, wash hands, dry and place the towel in the trash. If your stom-ach hurts, tell the teacher.

At the end of the school day, place all notes and papers in your backpack, and be ready to share them with your family.

For more early learning tips see grand-parentsteachtoo.org and wnmufm.org for pod casts and live schedule of “Learning Through the Seasons.”

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (19)

Arvada Press 19September 4, 2014

SPORTS

Tigers look like they have found some magic this seasonBy Daniel [emailprotected]

ARVADA - Lakewood golf has some-thing special this season.

The Tigers team week after week and match after match are starting to prove that they are not only the best 5A Jeffco team but one of the best 5A teams in the state.

And again on Friday they were the best 5A Jeffco team at the Jeffco League Tour-nament at Indian Tree Golf Course.

The Tigers posted a team score of 299, nine strokes better than second place Ralston Valley. (308). Columbine finished third as a team with a 310 total and Da-kota Ridge shot 322 finishing fourth.

Moreover, Lakewood had three of the top six individual scores at the tourna-ment, as J.J. Amato shot a 73, and Griffin Barela and Jack Castiglia both shot 74. The top 5A individual golfer was Colum-bine’s Marcus Tait who shot 69.

But it was the Tigers as a team that that had the most impressive day as they continue their impressive start to their season.

“I am a really lucky coach right now. We have a bunch of guys who can really play and they are all still getting better,” Lakewood coach Alan Gonzales said. “And not only are we a really good team, we are a really good young team.”

The 4A side of the Jeffco tournament was a different story. As expected, Valor Christian dominated the 4A Jeffco field, shooting a team score of 281.

The Eagles’ 281 score was 20 shots bet-ter than second place Evergreen which shot 301. Littleton shot 327 finishing fourth followed by Green Mountain (327) and D’Evelyn (328).

But Valor dominated at a level that al-most didn’t seem fair, claiming all three of the top 4A golfers in the tournament, as well as four of five finishers.

Valor’s Coby Welch, Pierce Aichinger and Tim Amundson all shot 70. Ever-green’s Liam Short had the next best 4A score shooting 71, tied with Valor’s Jake Staiano.

Valor Christian, although nowhere near Jefferson County, joined 4A Jeffco for this season and next season, at the least, as a part of CHSAA’s realignment.

The Eagles have won four of the past five 4A state championships as a team and though Valor is considered a football school they may be even better at golf. Fair or not, 4A Jeffco better get used to Valor being exceptional at golf.

Pomona’s Grant Olinger again proved himself as one of the state’s best individual golfers shooting a 71 during Friday’s Je�co league Tournament. Olinger’s 71 was the second lowest score of the tournament. Photos by Daniel Williams

Lakewood’s J.J. Amaro has one of the prettiest swings you will ever see. He also has one of the most complete golf games in Je�co, evident by him shooting 73 during the Je�co League Tournament Friday at Indian Tree Golf Course.

LAKEWOOD, VALOR DOMINATE JEFFCO LEAGUE TOURNEY

PGA’s best to tee it up at Cherry HillsSta� Report

With dozens of the world’s best profes-sional golfers set to tee it up at Cherry Hills Country Club this week, tickets are at a premium.

No tickets will be sold at the gate for the Sept. 4-7 BMW Championship and fans are encouraged to check online at www.BMWChampionshipUSA.com for avail-ability.

“We do expect to see maybe over 140,000 fans for the week,” said BMW

Championship General Chairman George Solich.

The BMW Championship is the third — and second to last — leg of the season-ending FedEx Cup playoffs. The top 70 players in the standings advance to Cher-ry Hills for the first Colorado PGA men’s event since the 2006 International at Cas-tle Pines.

The top 125 players in the FedEx stand-ings, which didn’t include Tiger Woods, played Aug. 21-24 at The Barclays in Para-mus, N.J. to kick off the playoffs. Hunter Mahan won the event, and in turn moved

from 62nd to first in the standings, drop-ping Rory McIlroy to second.

Playoff contenders were trimmed to 100 for the Deutsche Bank Championship Aug. 29-Sept. 1 in Norton, Mass., and the top 70 will then come to Cherry Hills.

Playoff points are added to those gar-nered during the regular season and points will determine the eventual cham-pion following the Tour Championship Sept. 11-14 in Atlanta. Only the leading 30 players in points after Cherry Hills will play in Atlanta.

In addition to Mahan and McIlroy, oth-

er celebrated players in the top 100 prior to the Deutsche Bank Championship in-clude Bubba Watson (fifth), 2010 FedEx champion Jim Furyk (sixth), Rickie Fowler (11th), Sergio Garcia (15th), Kent Denver graduate Kevin Stadler (34th), Ernie Els (39th) and Phil Mickelson (57th).

The contenders who make the Cherry Hills field will compete on a 7,352-yard, par 70 course with 3-inch deep rough.

“With the rain we’ve had, the rough has got some teeth,” Solich said.

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20 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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Alameda kicks o� season with win over Je�ersonWheat Ridge at 2-0 has yet to give up a point this seasonBy Daniel [emailprotected]

Alameda/Jefferson: The Pirates surprised Jeffco football by blowing out Jefferson 68-12 Friday at Trailblazer Stadi-um.

Alameda starts off its season with a victory over a Jeffer-son program that qualified for the state playoffs last season.

The Saints lost several key players to graduation and growing pains, like the pain Alameda imposed last Friday, was to be expected.

The Pirates (1-0) will play at Skyview Friday at 7 p.m.The Saints (0-1) will try and regroup with a victory over

Rifle who they will host Friday at 6 p.m. at Trailblazer Sta-dium.

Arvada: The Bulldogs dropped a nail biter to Sheridan falling 33-25 Friday at Sheridan High School.

Sheridan’s home field proved to be the difference in a game that could have went either way and Arvada fell to 0-2 on the young season.

In the loss Arvada sophom*ore quarterback Ian Coleman passed for 374 yards and four touchdowns. But a couple untimely interceptions ended up costing the Bulldogs down the stretch.

Arvada will play at Berthoud Friday at 7 p.m.Arvada West: The Wildcats started off the season with

an impressive 32-19 victory over Douglas County Friday at North Area Athletic Complex.

It was also the first win of the Brad Pyatt era, as A-West hired the first year head coach in the offseason.

Arvada West trailed after the first quarter but went on to score 20 unanswered points over the next two quarters to secure the victory.

The Wildcats (1-0) will play at Smoky Hill Saturday at 6 p.m.

D’Evelyn: The Jaguars started off their season with a 34-0 blowout victory over Weld Central Saturday at Trail-blazer Stadium.

D’Evelyn senior running back Ian Lewis ran wild com-piling 215 rushing yards and three touchdowns.

On the other side of the ball senior Mike Trimble was all over the field Friday night, recording 11 tackles (two for a loss).

The Jaguars (1-0) will play at Greeley West Friday at 7 p.m.

Green Mountain: The Rams rallied but still fell to Gree-ley Central 31-24 Saturday at Greeley Central High School.

The Wildcats took a 14-3 first quarter lead putting Green Mountain in a hole. But behind senior running back Chance Boyce, rushing for 180 yards and three touchdowns, the team almost came back.

But the Rams couldn’t close the gap as Greeley Central scored a backbreaking fourth quarter touchdown.

Green Mountain (0-1) will play Golden Friday at 4 p.m. at Jeffco Stadium.

Wheat Ridge: The Farmers have started off their season with two monsters victories with the latest coming in a 49-0 beatdown Friday at Littleton High School.

But more impressive is the fact that Wheat Ridge is yet to give up a single point through two games this season. The Farmers opened their season with a 42-0 victory over Pueblo Central and after Friday’s win have outperformed their opposition 91-0 this season.

Credit new head coach Dan Reardon with Wheat Ridge’s impressive start, but it will be interesting to see if the Farm-ers can maintain their high level of play.

Wheat Ridge (2-0) will host Pueblo South next Thursday at 7 p.m. at Jeffco Stadium.

SPORTS QUIZ1) Name the last team before the 2013 Chicago Cubs to be shut out �ve times in

seven home games.2) Who was the �rst Colombian native to play in the major leagues?3) When was the last time before 2013 that the �rst two overall picks in the NFL

Draft were o�ensive linemen?4) How long was the Michigan State men’s basketball team absent from the NCAA

Tournament before Magic Johnson helped take the Spartans there in 1978?5) Who was the last Boston Bruins player before Patrice Bergeron in 2014 to

record a seven-game goal-scoring streak?6) Name the �rst pair to have two Olympic ice dancing gold medals.7) In 2014, golfer Miguel Angel Jimenez became the third player to lead from

start to �nish in his Champions Tour debut. Name either of the other two.Answers1) The 1963 New York Mets.2) Luis Castro of the Philadelphia Athletics in 1902.3) It was 1968, when Ron Yary and Bob Johnson were the �rst two picks.4) It was 19 seasons.5) Geo� Courtnall, in the 1985-86 season.6) Russia’s Oksana Grishuk and Evgeni Platov, in 1994-98.7) Rod Funseth (1983) and Bruce Fleisher (1999).

2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (21)

Arvada Press 21September 4, 2014

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE

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Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (22)

22 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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Broom�eld outlasts A-West VolleyballImproved Wildcats fall to Eagles in dramatic ��h setBy Daniel [emailprotected]

ARVADA - The Arvada West Wildcats looked really good in the season opener against Broomfield — only they lost the match.

The Wildcats were beat by the Eagles 3-2 (25-27, 25-13, 17-25, 25-22, 2-15) in a thrill-er that went back and forth and was evenly matched until the final set.

A-West senior Mikaila Paxton led the Wildcats with 13 kills and helped over-power Broomfield during stretches of the match.

Paxton and sophom*ore Aza Underwood (nine kills) helped push the Eagles for four full sets but the youth of Arvada West caught up with them in the final set.

That is when Broomfield’s senior lead-ership caught up with A-West, as senior’s Callie Kaiser and Tori Biggerstaff helped take over the match down the stretch.

Kaiser recorded 19 kills and routinely made big plays to keep Broomfield in con-trol and Biggerstaff’s 15 kills were the third most by any player in the match.

But Broomfield wasn’t just a dynamic duo. It took a total team effort for the Ea-gles to hold off the Wildcats.

Junior Kaley Radcliff led Broomfield with 25 digs and sophom*ore Madi Radem-acher led all players with six blocks and six aces.

Arvada West junior Amalia Linton led her team with 14 digs and junior Kayla San-chez led the Wildcats with 26 assists.

A-West played hard for all five sets and at times looked superior to Broomfield, but the Wildcats are also one of the youngest teams in 5A Jeffco with only three seniors

on their roster.On the other hand, Broomfield has sev-

eral key players who are all seniors and who all stepped up when called on.

A-West and Broomfield were both mid-dle-tier teams in their leagues last season, both looking to take a big step this season. And despite the loss for Arvada West both teams still could make that leap to the top

of their league standings.A-West finished 11-11 (3-5 in league)

last season behind several really good teams like Lakewood, Ralston Valley and Bear Creek. This season the Wildcats plan on finishing the season as a top three team in 5A Jeffco.

Broomfield struggled last season and finished 9-16 (5-9 in league). But was also a

better team than the record might indicate.But by the end of the season you could

see that the Eagles were improving, evident by Broomfield winning four of five games near their season’s end.

The Eagles will host Monarch on Thurs-day at 6:30 p.m.

A-West will play at Cherry Creek Friday at 6:30 p.m.

Arvada West junior Mikaila Paxton goes airborne and spikes what was a kill shot during the Wildcats match with Broom�eld Thursday at A-West High School. But Broom�eld won the match 3-2. Photo by Daniel Williams

Valor outlasts Pomona in battle of state’s bestPanthers mistakes come back to bite them in the endBy Daniel [emailprotected]

ARVADA - It is not often that one of the biggest high school footballs games of the year is played so early in the season, but sched-ule-makers paired Pomona and Valor Christian Thurs-day at North Area Athletic Complex.

The reigning 5A state champions held off the Panthers’ best effort, as Valor beat Pomona 21-12 in a physical slugfest that the Eagles survived.

The powerhouse Pan-thers didn’t disappoint. Po-mona pushed Valor to the brink, and if it wasn’t for a few self imposed mistakes the Panthers might have been able to steal a victory.

In a first half that fea-tured two stout defenses Valor quarterback sopho-more and son of Denver Broncos’ icon Ed Mc-Caffery scored a rushing touchdown from 1-yard out in the first quarter for the first half’s only score.

But the back-and-forth physical brand of football delivered by both teams led to McCaffrey being knocked out of the game and replaced by senior Parker Courier.

Pomona finally got on the board in the third quar-ter after a long grind-out drive that was created after a Courier interception.

The Panthers marched down the field and sopho-more Cameron Gonzales scored a 7-yard touch-down. However, that only made the score 7-6 after a missed Pomona extra point.

The Panthers were still on the prowl to try and knock off the state cham-pions, going into the fourth quarter down just one point. However, that was before Courier and Valor went down the field two

more times in the fourth quarter for two more touchdowns, to extending the lead to 21-6.

The Panthers would rally late in the game as senior quarterback Justin Roberts led Pomona on a scoring drive with just un-der four minutes left in the game. But Pomona failed to convert on the two-point conversion try, leaving the Panthers with no hope as they remained two scores away from catching the Eagles.

Pomona’s special teams’ mistakes, as well as an ill-advised interception came back to haunt the Panthers team who felt — and prob-ably still do feel — like Val-or’s equals.

This early season game that finished dramatically could be just a preview of a potential state champion-ship game as both team are considered top five teams in the state (if not the two best teams in the state).

Pomona (0-1) has no time to mope. The Pan-thers will play Cherry Creek, another 5A state power, Friday at 7 p.m. at Stutler Bowl.

Valor improved to 2-0 with the first victory of the season coming at Bonnev-ille, an Idaho team that was destroyed 61-20 during Week Zero. The Eagles also have a 25-game winning streak against Colorado opponents dating back to 2012.

Two of the state’s top football powers lined up against each other Thursday with Valor Christian hanging on to beat Pomona 21-12 at North Area Athletic Complex. Photo by Daniel Williams

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and

cultural events are happening in your area and the

areas around you? Visit our website at www.colora-

docommunitymedia.com/calendar.

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (23)

Arvada Press 23September 4, 2014

OF GAMESGALLERYc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u

& w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

GALLERY OF GAMESc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u & w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

SALOME’S STARSFOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 1, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Be careful not to allow the backers of a new financial “deal” to pull the wool over the Lamb’s eyes. It could hold fewer plusses and more negatives than you were first led to believe.

TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) It’s a good idea to fin-ish all incomplete tasks so that you can devote your attention to next week’s projects. The weekend could hold surprises for romantic Fernandas and Ferdinands.

GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) A workplace suggestion you made a while ago that you might have forgot-ten could come back with a request to turn it from idea to reality. Your social life picks up considerably this weekend.

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) Someone from the past could return with an intriguing opportunity for a future project. Check into it, by all means. But don’t neglect your current responsibilities in the meantime.

LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Keeping your claws sheathed and using good humor instead to counter someone who’s bad-mouthing the Big Cat isn’t easy. But it’s the best way to avoid more problems down the line.

VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) A workplace situation could improve if you’re less critical and more support-ive of those who are, after all, trying to do their best. Let them know you’re there to help when necessary.

LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) A new job offer might not carry all the benefits you’re seeking. Make sure you know what you’re entitled to, what is off the table and what is negotiable before you make a decision.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) A social obligation you would rather get out of could hold some surprisingly positive aspects. Why not go and see for yourself? A family member makes a curious request.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Before tackling that new project awaiting you at home or on the job, take time out for some much-deserved pampering to help lift your spirits and restore your energy levels.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) Your social calen-dar begins to fill up more quickly than you expected. And that’s great. You deserve to enjoy some good fun after so much time spent on serious matters.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) A domestic situ-ation continues to improve, thanks to all the tender, loving concern you’ve shown. A colleague makes a questionable move that you might want to check out sooner rather than later.

PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) A sudden turn in a ro-mantic relationship calls for both a rational and pas-sionate response. Keep the love level high, but also find out why the problem arose in the first place.

BORN THIS WEEK: You often set high standards for others. But to your credit, you set the same expec-tations for yourself.

© 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

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FUNDING POOL, AND THEPROPOSED 2015 C.D.B.G.

ANNUAL ACTION PLAN

The US Department of Housing and Urb-an Development requires local jurisdic-tions receiving certain grant funds to pre-pare a Consolidated Strategy and Plan forHousing and Community DevelopmentPrograms (Consolidated Plan) and Annu-al Action Plans.The City of Arvada is preparing its pro-posed Consolidated Plan and AnnualAction Plan for 2015 - 2019 and is en-couraging citizen participation in the pre-paration of the Consolidated Plan and2015 Action Plan. The 2015 Action Planwill outline the proposed use of an estim-ated $500,000 in 2015 Community Devel-opment Block Grant Funds (CDBG).The City invites all citizens and other inter-ested parties who desire to provide com-ments on City housing and community de-velopment needs including priority non-housing community development needs;use of year 2015 CDBG; or past programperformance; AND/OR to make com-ments regarding use of year 2014 fund-ing from the Human Services FundingPool to do so at a public hearing:At 6:30 P.M., September 15, 2014in City Council Chambers,Arvada Municipal Building,8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Colorado.Relevant program information is availableby contacting the City Manager’s Office,Arvada City Hall, 8101 Ralston Road,between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.Monday through Friday, or call 720-898-7500.CDBG AND HUMAN SERVICESFUNDING POOL APPLICATIONPROCESSAll citizens and other interested partieswhich desire to apply for year 2015 Com-munity Development Block Grant or year2014 Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing from the City of Arvada MUST com-plete an Application Form and submit thatform BY 5:00 PM on September 10, 2014to the City Manager’s Office, Arvada CityHall, 8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Color-ado 80002. Please contact the personslisted below to obtain instructions, applica-tion forms, or for further questions. Theapplication form and instructions are alsoavailable online at:http://arvada.org/city-services/community-development-block-grant-program/FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:Please contact Ms. Cherrie Maltos regard-ing Community Development Block Grantfunding at 720-898-7494, between 8:00A.M. to 5:00 P.M., weekdays.Please contact Maria VanderKolk regard-ing Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing at 720-898-7500, between 8:00 A.M.to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.

Legal Notice No.: 80824First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada PressNot consecutive publications

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGAND FUNDING APPLICATION

PROCESS FOR THE COMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

CONSOLIDATED STRATEGY ANDPLAN FOR HOUSING AND

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMS, THE HUMAN SERVICES

FUNDING POOL, AND THEPROPOSED 2015 C.D.B.G.

ANNUAL ACTION PLAN

The US Department of Housing and Urb-an Development requires local jurisdic-tions receiving certain grant funds to pre-pare a Consolidated Strategy and Plan forHousing and Community DevelopmentPrograms (Consolidated Plan) and Annu-al Action Plans.The City of Arvada is preparing its pro-posed Consolidated Plan and AnnualAction Plan for 2015 - 2019 and is en-couraging citizen participation in the pre-paration of the Consolidated Plan and2015 Action Plan. The 2015 Action Planwill outline the proposed use of an estim-ated $500,000 in 2015 Community Devel-opment Block Grant Funds (CDBG).The City invites all citizens and other inter-ested parties who desire to provide com-ments on City housing and community de-velopment needs including priority non-housing community development needs;use of year 2015 CDBG; or past programperformance; AND/OR to make com-ments regarding use of year 2014 fund-ing from the Human Services FundingPool to do so at a public hearing:At 6:30 P.M., September 15, 2014in City Council Chambers,Arvada Municipal Building,8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Colorado.Relevant program information is availableby contacting the City Manager’s Office,Arvada City Hall, 8101 Ralston Road,between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.Monday through Friday, or call 720-898-7500.CDBG AND HUMAN SERVICESFUNDING POOL APPLICATIONPROCESSAll citizens and other interested partieswhich desire to apply for year 2015 Com-munity Development Block Grant or year2014 Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing from the City of Arvada MUST com-plete an Application Form and submit thatform BY 5:00 PM on September 10, 2014to the City Manager’s Office, Arvada CityHall, 8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Color-ado 80002. Please contact the personslisted below to obtain instructions, applica-tion forms, or for further questions. Theapplication form and instructions are alsoavailable online at:http://arvada.org/city-services/community-development-block-grant-program/FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:Please contact Ms. Cherrie Maltos regard-ing Community Development Block Grantfunding at 720-898-7494, between 8:00A.M. to 5:00 P.M., weekdays.Please contact Maria VanderKolk regard-ing Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing at 720-898-7500, between 8:00 A.M.to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.

Legal Notice No.: 80824First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada PressNot consecutive publications

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGAND FUNDING APPLICATION

PROCESS FOR THE COMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

CONSOLIDATED STRATEGY ANDPLAN FOR HOUSING AND

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMS, THE HUMAN SERVICES

FUNDING POOL, AND THEPROPOSED 2015 C.D.B.G.

ANNUAL ACTION PLAN

The US Department of Housing and Urb-an Development requires local jurisdic-tions receiving certain grant funds to pre-pare a Consolidated Strategy and Plan forHousing and Community DevelopmentPrograms (Consolidated Plan) and Annu-al Action Plans.The City of Arvada is preparing its pro-posed Consolidated Plan and AnnualAction Plan for 2015 - 2019 and is en-couraging citizen participation in the pre-paration of the Consolidated Plan and2015 Action Plan. The 2015 Action Planwill outline the proposed use of an estim-ated $500,000 in 2015 Community Devel-opment Block Grant Funds (CDBG).The City invites all citizens and other inter-ested parties who desire to provide com-ments on City housing and community de-velopment needs including priority non-housing community development needs;use of year 2015 CDBG; or past programperformance; AND/OR to make com-ments regarding use of year 2014 fund-ing from the Human Services FundingPool to do so at a public hearing:At 6:30 P.M., September 15, 2014in City Council Chambers,Arvada Municipal Building,8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Colorado.Relevant program information is availableby contacting the City Manager’s Office,Arvada City Hall, 8101 Ralston Road,between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.Monday through Friday, or call 720-898-7500.CDBG AND HUMAN SERVICESFUNDING POOL APPLICATIONPROCESSAll citizens and other interested partieswhich desire to apply for year 2015 Com-munity Development Block Grant or year2014 Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing from the City of Arvada MUST com-plete an Application Form and submit thatform BY 5:00 PM on September 10, 2014to the City Manager’s Office, Arvada CityHall, 8101 Ralston Road, Arvada, Color-ado 80002. Please contact the personslisted below to obtain instructions, applica-tion forms, or for further questions. Theapplication form and instructions are alsoavailable online at:http://arvada.org/city-services/community-development-block-grant-program/FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:Please contact Ms. Cherrie Maltos regard-ing Community Development Block Grantfunding at 720-898-7494, between 8:00A.M. to 5:00 P.M., weekdays.Please contact Maria VanderKolk regard-ing Human Services Funding Pool fund-ing at 720-898-7500, between 8:00 A.M.to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.

Legal Notice No.: 80824First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada PressNot consecutive publications

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA public hearing will be held before the Ar-vada City Council on September 15, 2014,at 6:30 p.m., Arvada Municipal Building,8101 Ralston Rd., Arvada, when andwhere you may speak on the matter toconsider a conditional use permit to al-low a commuter parking lot as a prin-ciple use for the A-LINE COMMUTERLOT, located at 7355 Ralston Rd.CITY OF ARVADA/s/Kristen R. Rush, Deputy City Clerk

Legal Notice No.: 80856First Publication: September 4, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Public Notice

ADVERTIsem*nT FOR BIDSSealed bids for the construction of Cityof Arvada Project No. 14-SR-01 entitled2014 Sanitary Sewer Main Replace-ment will be received at the office ofthe City Engineer until 10:00 am onSeptember 10, 2014 and then publiclyopened and read aloud.The BID DOCUMENTS, consisting of Ad-vertisem*nt for Bids, Information for Bid-ders, Special Conditions, Addendum whenissued, Bid Bond, Bid Proposal, and BidSchedule forms, and the Project Draw-ings (12”x18”) may be examined at the fol-lowing locations:City of Arvada Engineering Division- 8101 Ralston Road,Arvada, Colorado 80002Dodge Plan Room– www.construction.comISqFt Plan Room– 1030 West Ellsworth Ave., Unit G,Denver, Colorado 80223Reed Construction Data- www.reedpsp.comRocky Mountain E-Purchasing Systemat www.rockymountainbidsystem.comNo cost bid documents may be obtainedat www.rockymountainbidsystem.com onor after August 21, 2014. Bid documentsmay also be obtained at the office of theCity Engineer upon payment of $30.00 perset, which is non-refundable.ESTIMATED QUANTITIES OF THEMAJOR ITEMS OF WORK ARE:4,750 LF Remove existing 8” dia. VCP,Furnish and Install 8” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main800 LF Remove existing 10” dia. VCPFurnish and Install 12” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main120 LF Furnish and Install 24” dia. steelcasing pipe20 EA Furnish and Install 4 foot diametermanhole75 EA Reconnect existing sewer servicepipeMiscellaneous items include traffic control,manhole connections, etc.Bidders, subcontractors and suppliersmust be familiar with the current City ofArvada Engineering Code of Standardsand Specifications for the Design andConstruction of Public Improvements,dated July 19, 2011, which will be com-bined with the Bid Documents to form theContract Documents for the Project. Acopy of the Standards may be obtainedfrom the office of the City Engineer upon anon-refundable payment of $30.00. Hold-ers will be notified when supplemental re-visions and additions are available as theyare adopted. The Standards are alsoavailable at no cost on the City's web siteat www.arvada.org. Holders are respons-ible for keeping current their City of Ar-vada Engineering Code of Standards andSpecifications.The Project Engineer for this work isTimothy R. Hoos, P.E. at 720-898-7644.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Timothy R. Hoos, P.E., City Engineer

Legal Notice No.: 80827First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Government Legals

Public Notice

ADVERTIsem*nT FOR BIDSSealed bids for the construction of Cityof Arvada Project No. 14-SR-01 entitled2014 Sanitary Sewer Main Replace-ment will be received at the office ofthe City Engineer until 10:00 am onSeptember 10, 2014 and then publiclyopened and read aloud.The BID DOCUMENTS, consisting of Ad-vertisem*nt for Bids, Information for Bid-ders, Special Conditions, Addendum whenissued, Bid Bond, Bid Proposal, and BidSchedule forms, and the Project Draw-ings (12”x18”) may be examined at the fol-lowing locations:City of Arvada Engineering Division- 8101 Ralston Road,Arvada, Colorado 80002Dodge Plan Room– www.construction.comISqFt Plan Room– 1030 West Ellsworth Ave., Unit G,Denver, Colorado 80223Reed Construction Data- www.reedpsp.comRocky Mountain E-Purchasing Systemat www.rockymountainbidsystem.comNo cost bid documents may be obtainedat www.rockymountainbidsystem.com onor after August 21, 2014. Bid documentsmay also be obtained at the office of theCity Engineer upon payment of $30.00 perset, which is non-refundable.ESTIMATED QUANTITIES OF THEMAJOR ITEMS OF WORK ARE:4,750 LF Remove existing 8” dia. VCP,Furnish and Install 8” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main800 LF Remove existing 10” dia. VCPFurnish and Install 12” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main120 LF Furnish and Install 24” dia. steelcasing pipe20 EA Furnish and Install 4 foot diametermanhole75 EA Reconnect existing sewer servicepipeMiscellaneous items include traffic control,manhole connections, etc.Bidders, subcontractors and suppliersmust be familiar with the current City ofArvada Engineering Code of Standardsand Specifications for the Design andConstruction of Public Improvements,dated July 19, 2011, which will be com-bined with the Bid Documents to form theContract Documents for the Project. Acopy of the Standards may be obtainedfrom the office of the City Engineer upon anon-refundable payment of $30.00. Hold-ers will be notified when supplemental re-visions and additions are available as theyare adopted. The Standards are alsoavailable at no cost on the City's web siteat www.arvada.org. Holders are respons-ible for keeping current their City of Ar-vada Engineering Code of Standards andSpecifications.The Project Engineer for this work isTimothy R. Hoos, P.E. at 720-898-7644.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Timothy R. Hoos, P.E., City Engineer

Legal Notice No.: 80827First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Government Legals

Public Notice

ADVERTIsem*nT FOR BIDSSealed bids for the construction of Cityof Arvada Project No. 14-SR-01 entitled2014 Sanitary Sewer Main Replace-ment will be received at the office ofthe City Engineer until 10:00 am onSeptember 10, 2014 and then publiclyopened and read aloud.The BID DOCUMENTS, consisting of Ad-vertisem*nt for Bids, Information for Bid-ders, Special Conditions, Addendum whenissued, Bid Bond, Bid Proposal, and BidSchedule forms, and the Project Draw-ings (12”x18”) may be examined at the fol-lowing locations:City of Arvada Engineering Division- 8101 Ralston Road,Arvada, Colorado 80002Dodge Plan Room– www.construction.comISqFt Plan Room– 1030 West Ellsworth Ave., Unit G,Denver, Colorado 80223Reed Construction Data- www.reedpsp.comRocky Mountain E-Purchasing Systemat www.rockymountainbidsystem.comNo cost bid documents may be obtainedat www.rockymountainbidsystem.com onor after August 21, 2014. Bid documentsmay also be obtained at the office of theCity Engineer upon payment of $30.00 perset, which is non-refundable.ESTIMATED QUANTITIES OF THEMAJOR ITEMS OF WORK ARE:4,750 LF Remove existing 8” dia. VCP,Furnish and Install 8” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main800 LF Remove existing 10” dia. VCPFurnish and Install 12” dia. PVC SanitarySewer Main120 LF Furnish and Install 24” dia. steelcasing pipe20 EA Furnish and Install 4 foot diametermanhole75 EA Reconnect existing sewer servicepipeMiscellaneous items include traffic control,manhole connections, etc.Bidders, subcontractors and suppliersmust be familiar with the current City ofArvada Engineering Code of Standardsand Specifications for the Design andConstruction of Public Improvements,dated July 19, 2011, which will be com-bined with the Bid Documents to form theContract Documents for the Project. Acopy of the Standards may be obtainedfrom the office of the City Engineer upon anon-refundable payment of $30.00. Hold-ers will be notified when supplemental re-visions and additions are available as theyare adopted. The Standards are alsoavailable at no cost on the City's web siteat www.arvada.org. Holders are respons-ible for keeping current their City of Ar-vada Engineering Code of Standards andSpecifications.The Project Engineer for this work isTimothy R. Hoos, P.E. at 720-898-7644.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Timothy R. Hoos, P.E., City Engineer

Legal Notice No.: 80827First Publication: August 21, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA public hearing will be held before theArvada City Council on September 15,2014, at 6:30 p.m., Arvada MunicipalBuilding, 8101 Ralston Rd., Arvada, whenand where you may speak on the matterto consider a preliminary developmentplan for RALSTON TOWNHOMES,located at 6012 Wadsworth Blvd.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Kristen R. Rush, Deputy City Clerk

Legal Notice No.: 80857First Publication: September 4, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Government Legals Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA public hearing will be held before theArvada City Council on September 15,2014, at 6:30 p.m., Arvada MunicipalBuilding, 8101 Ralston Rd., Arvada, whenand where you may speak on the matterto consider a preliminary developmentplan for POPEYE’S @ ARVADA RIDGE,located at 5045 Kipling St.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Kristen R. Rush, Deputy City Clerk

Legal Notice No.: 80858First Publication: September 4, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA public hearing will be held before the Ar-vada City Council on September 15, 2014,at 6:30 p.m., Arvada Municipal Building,8101 Ralston Rd., Arvada, when andwhere you may speak on the matter toconsider a preliminary developmentp l a n a n d p r e l i m i n a r y p l a t f o rRICHARD’S FARM, located at W. 72ndAvenue and Alkire Street.CITY OF ARVADA/s/ Kristen R. Rush, Deputy City Clerk

Legal Notice No.: 80859First Publication: September 4, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Wheat Ridge Transcriptand the Arvada Press

Garrison St., Lakewood. Contact CJ Farr, 303-985-3278 or [emailprotected].

NARCONON REMINDS families that abuse of addictive pharmaceutical drugs is on the rise. Learn to recognize the signs of drug abuse and get your loved ones help if they are at risk. Call Narconon for a free brochure on the signs addiction for all types of drugs. Narconon also o�ers free assessments and referrals. Call 800-431-1754 or go to DrugAbuseSolution.com. Narconon also can help with addiction counseling. Call for free assessments or referrals, 800-431-1754.

NO KILL Colorado’s monthly meeting is from 6:30-9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at Lakewood HealthSource, 963 S. Kipling Parkway, Lakewood. Everyone interested in learning about the No Kill movement is welcome. No Kill Colorado’s pur-

pose is to facilitate a Colorado whose shelters are open admission and saving a minimum of 90 percent of the animals.

NORTH JEFFCO Republican Women meets the second Tuesday of every month at the 911 Driving School, 9100 100th Ave., Suite B-4, Westminster. Check-in is at 6:45 p.m., meeting is from 7-9 p.m. Each month outstanding speakers present information vital to our community. Come join us to deepen your knowledge of election candidates, current legislation, and upcoming events. Both men and women are invited to attend. Admission is free.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS meetings are from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays at First United Methodist Church, 1500 Ford St., Golden. The meetings provide 12-step help and fellowship. Individuals of all ages coming together to support recovery for compulsive overeaters, bulimics, anorexics and exercise addicts.

PET VACCINATIONS Low-cost pet vaccinations at SpayToday 3-4 p.m. every Sunday. Call 303-984-7729 for more information.

PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY Support Group The Lakewood Branch of the Rocky Mountain Neuropathy Association meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the fourth Saturday of every month at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 7100 W. Mississippi Ave., Lakewood. For more information about the Lakewood Branch Support Group, call Rose at 303-279-3511 or email [emailprotected].

QUILT TOPS The Je�co Hand Quilters are 18 women who gather every Monday to turn quilt tops into �nished heirloom quilts. The group will do estimates from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mon-days, except holidays, at Lakewood United Methodist Church, 14th and Brentwood. Money earned from the quilting is donated to the Action Center, helping feed and clothe those who need assistance. You may call Mary Wollenhaupt at 303-986-1381 for more information. We also welcome quilters to join our group.

RALSTON CREEK Sertoma Club meets Thursdays at Panera Bread, 7739 Wadsworth, Arvada. Contact Ron Marquez at 303-

457-0759 or [emailprotected].

REALITY CHECK Learn, laugh and move beyond denial in a small, cozy, group workshop environment. Join me for a facilitated Reality Check. Put on your big-girl pants, and call 303-953-2344 for details.

RUNNING SCHEDULE Foothills Running and Cycling Club’s activity schedule includes long runs at 8 a.m. every Saturday and cycling rides every Sunday at 10 a.m. Both activities meet at Clear Creek History Park, 11th and Arapahoe. For more informa-tion and updates on times, visit www.frcclub.com.

RUNNING AT DAWN Buddies We are a group of friendly runners of varying abilities and ages who enjoy running close to sunrise. We meet at 5:30 a.m. Wednesdays near Jackson Park in Lakewood, and run around the neighborhood, ending back at the starting location by 6:30 a.m. No fees, just neighborly good will and fun. For information, contact [emailprotected].

AREA CLUBSContinued from Page 16

Arvada Press 0904 - [PDF Document] (24)

24 Arvada Press September 4, 2014

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